Charger hatchback 2020

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Dodge Charger Generations

The Dodge Charger is an iconic American model that has appeared in several different forms throughout its lifetime. It was originally considered a muscle car but it's also been sold as a full-size sedan, luxury coupe, and even a subcompact hatchback. Here's a look at the various generations of the Dodge Charger.

2011 - Present Dodge Charger (LD 7th Generation)

dodge-charger-7th-generation

The current seventh generation of Charger has three iterations; one was sold for the 2011 to 2014 model years (seen in blue below), another has been on sale since the 2015 model year (seen above in red) and the most recent has been on the market since 2019.

This generation is loosely based on the previous Charger platform, which it shares with the two-door Dodge Challenger and the four-door Chrysler 300.

The interiors for this generation include a new, 7-inch instrument cluster display and a revised Uconnect touchscreen. Since 2015, the interiors have been reworked to include new materials and styling for all the door panels, console, and dashboard.

Engines include the 3.6-liter Pentastar V6, a 5.7-liter Hemi V8, a 6.2-liter supercharged V8 in the Hellcat, and a 6.4-liter Hemi V8.

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Transmissions offered included five-speed and eight-speed automatics. In 2015, Dodge discontinued the AWD option of previous generations.

The V6 engine was rated at 300 horsepower while the largest SRT Hellcat Redeye's V8 put out 797 horsepower.

This generation has several different specialty trims in addition to the Hellcat, including the R/T Scat Pack, Charger Widebody, and Dodge Charger SRT 392.

In 2021, Dodge introduced a significantly upgraded version of the Hellcat called the SRT Hellcat Redeye. This version is similar to the Challenger Redeye in that it features the same 6.2-liter supercharged V8 with specs of 797 horsepower and 707 lb-ft of torque and a top speed of 203 MPH but with the retro body style of the Charger. It also has some other high-performance additions including an 8-speed ZF automatic transmission and a suspension tuned for the track with an aluminum rear differential for more rigid handling. On top of that, it also has an after-run chiller for efficient cool-down.

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2006 - 2010 Dodge Charger (LX 6th Generation)

dodge-charger-6th-generation

The sixth generation of Charger debuted for the 2006 model year as a four-door sedan, a departure from earlier generations which were largely coupes. This new LX platform was considered a half-sedan and half-muscle car; its design undoubtedly took cues from the more muscular look of earlier generations and Charger models. It featured rear-wheel-drive or all-wheel-drive and offered two V6s and two Hemi V8s. Transmission choices included a four- and five-speed automatic. The 250-horsepower, 3.5-liter V6 was in the base trims, while a 5.7-liter V8 Hemi engine put out 340 horsepower through 2008. In 2009, this went up slightly to 368. A 6.1-liter V8 on the Charger SRT8 model put out 425 horsepower.

View 6th Generations Listings

1982 - 1987 Dodge Charger (L-Body 5th Generation)

dodge-charger-5th-generation

After taking a short production break, the Charger for this fifth generation looked absolutely nothing like any Charger that came before it. It had transformed into a three-door subcompact hatchback with front-wheel drive. Along with this new, smaller look came smaller engines. Only inline-four cylinder engines were offered throughout its run, including two turbo versions. A four-speed Volkswagen manual transmission was offered along with a five-speed manual and a three-speed automatic. The wheelbase was now less than 100 inches, which made it about 20 inches shorter than most previous Chargers. The inline-four cylinder engines put out anywhere from 62 horsepower on the low end to 84 on the high end. Eventually, a Shelby Charger was introduced and it offered a high-compression engine that put out 107 horsepower. After this generation, the Charger would disappear for nearly 20 years.

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1975 - 1978 Dodge Charger (B-Body 4th Generation)

dodge-charger-4th-generation

The Charger got a facelift as a luxury car for the fourth generation and the body was redesigned to look the part. Gone were the beefy muscle car lines, replaced with the sharp, stately lines of a sedan. The length increased by a whopping 10 inches from the previous generation. It was still a two-door car and transmission options remained the same and only V8 engines were offered. The standard engine was the two-barrel small block V8 with an optional high-performance four-barrel that featured 225 horsepower. The 1978 Charger was actually marketed as a Magnum, but it used the Charger body.

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1971 - 1974 Dodge Charger (B-Body 3rd Generation)

dodge-charger-3rd-generation

This third-generation Dodge Charger was distinctive due to its split grille and slightly more rounded body. Options for the 1971 model included a rear spoiler and a pop-up scoop on the hood. As with the previous generation, a range of V8 powertrains was offered as well as the lone inline-six. Three-speed automatic and manual transmissions were available as well as a four-speed manual. The wheelbase decreased by two inches as did the overall length.

The 1972 model replaced the 383-cubic inch engine with a four-barrel 400-cubic inch unit that had lower compression. A 440-cubic inch engine continued to be available, but it also had lower compression and the horsepower went down to 280 from 350. The muscle car era more or less came to an end in 1974 for the Charger and all performance options were discontinued.

View 3rd Generations Listings

1968 - 1970 Dodge Charger (B-Body 2nd Generation)

dodge-charger-2nd-generation

The second generation of Charger still built on the B-body platform, abandoned the sophisticated look of the first generation in its design. Both the rear and front clips now curved in what was known as a coke bottle profile. The wheelbase remained the same, but the car's overall length increased by about five inches. Again, mostly V8s were available in this generation, but a 3.7-liter inline-six cylinder unit was also offered for the first time for the 1969 and 1970 model years. The 1969 Charger featured two 383 cubic-inch V8 engines in the two-barrel and four-barrel. The former put out 290 horsepower and the latter topped out at 330 horsepower. This generation of Charger benefited greatly from being featured in popular media of the day. A 1969 Charger was featured in The Dukes of Hazzard TV show while a 1968 Charger R/T 440 was featured in the famous street chase in the movie Bullitt. This generation also featured the Dodge Charger Daytona, a limited edition iteration that was developed for racing in NASCAR events.

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1966 - 1967 Dodge Charger (B-Body 1st Generation)

dodge-charger-1st-generation

The first generation of Dodge Charger debuted as a two-door fastback for the 1966 model year. This original Charger was a large, hefty car, and it didn't immediately have the muscle car image. The only engine available was a V8, which came in various sizes and could be paired with a three or four-speed manual transmission. There was also a three-speed automatic available. The largest engine was the 7.0-liter 426 Hemi, which put out 425 horsepower. The Charger also featured a unique interior with rear bucket seats, which could be folded down to provide more space that was accessible from the rear hatch. Other Charger-exclusive interior items for this generation included courtesy lights and instrument panels lit with electroluminescence instead of bulbs.

View 2nd Generations Listings

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Dodge Charger

Series of automobiles marketed by Dodge

This article is about the Charger manufactured by Dodge of Stellantis. For the Charger made by Chrysler of Australia, see Chrysler Valiant Charger.

Motor vehicle

Dodge Charger
1969 Dodge Charger (21572136732).jpg
ManufacturerDodge
Production
  • 1966–1978
  • 1981–1987
  • 2005–present
Model years
  • 1966–1978
  • 1982–1987
  • 2006–present

The Dodge Charger is a model of automobile marketed by Dodge in various forms over seven generations between 1966 and today.

The first Charger was a show car in 1964.[1][2] A 1965 Charger II concept car had a remarkable resemblance to the 1966 production version.[3]

The Charger has been built on three different platforms in various sizes. In the United States, the Charger nameplate has been used on subcompact hatchbacks, full-size sedans, muscle cars, and personal luxury coupes. The current version is a four-door sedan.

Background[edit]

The 1966 Charger was an effort by Dodge to produce an upscale, upsized pony car. American Motors had already built a very similar vehicle in 1965, the Marlin, which was positioned as a personal car, an emerging market niche.

Mercury was more successful in its execution in introducing the upscale Cougar, which was both considerably larger and more refined than the Ford Mustang that pioneered the pony car concept in 1964 - yet still had badly compromised rear seating.

The Charger was intended to up the ante to an even more expensive and luxurious coupe that featured all-bucket seating for four.

First generation: 1966–1967[edit]

Main article: Dodge Charger (B-body) § First generation

The Charger was introduced during the 1966 model year. It featured a two-door fastback body design and a four bucket seat interior. The intermediate-sized Charger shared components with the Coronet that also used the Chrysler B platform. The base engine was a 318 cu in (5.2 L) V8 with a three-speed manual and an optional automatic transmission. Larger and more powerful engines were also available such as the 426 cubic inch Hemi V8. Sales were low.

Second generation: 1968–1970[edit]

Main article: Dodge Charger (B-body) § Second generation

The Charger was redesigned for 1968, and an initial 35,000 units were slated for production. The demand was high and 96,100 Chargers were actually produced.[4] Based on the Chrysler B platform, the model years received various cosmetic changes to the exterior and interior including: an undivided grill, rounded tail lights, and hidden headlights. The powertrains were carried over from 1967, but the 225 cu in (3.7 L) slant-6 became available in mid-1968.[5] The Charger was not successful in stock car racing such as NASCAR. A more aerodynamic shape formed the Charger 500 model that became the basis for the 1969 Charger Daytona.

Third generation: 1971–1974[edit]

Main article: Dodge Charger (B-body) § Third generation

The third generation Charger was introduced for the 1971 model year. Chrysler's B platform was modified to meet new emissions and safety regulations. Available in six different packages with cosmetic changes that include: a split grill, semi fastback rear window, and a ducktail spoiler. The 1973 and 1974 Chargers were similar to the 1971, with minor differences in the grille and headlamps. 1973 and 1974 Chargers also wore new quarter windows, which were larger and shaped differently than the quarter windows seen on 1971 and 1972 models. The increase in sales was primarily due to the elimination of the Dodge Coronet, which meant Dodge offered the two-door intermediate-size body style only as of the Charger.

The name Charger was also used in Brazil as a performance model based on the Dart (A-Body) (1971–80).

Fourth generation: 1975–1978[edit]

Main article: Dodge Charger (B-body) § Fourth generation

The 1975 model year Charger continued as a B body car and was restyled in an effort by Dodge to move the model into the growing personal luxury car market segment. In 1978 Dodge added the Magnum to that segment. A Daytona model fourth-generation Charger featured stripes that ran along the length of the car.

Fifth generation: 1982–1987[edit]

1987 Charger "Shelby Edition"

Main article: Dodge Charger (L-body)

The Charger returned in 1981½ as a front-wheel drive subcompact hatchback coupe, available with a five-speed manual or three-speed automatic transmission. This economy-type model was similar to the Dodge Omni 024, but slightly larger. The Charger was available with a 2.2 L SOHC engine or a turbocharged 2.2 L SOHC. The turbo was available only with the manual transmission, unlike in the Dodge Daytona. A Shelby Charger was offered starting in 1983, with a turbo version available in 1984 producing 142 hp (106 kW; 144 PS) @ 5600 rpm and 160 pound force-feet (220 N⋅m) of torque @ 3200 rpm. The engine was not intercooled and used a small t3 Garrett turbo. In 1985, the electronics were updated, but the power output was the same. In 1986, the electronics were further updated.

Sixth generation: 2006–2010 (LX)[edit]

Main article: Dodge Charger (LX/LD)

After a 20 year absence, Dodge reintroduced the Charger in 2005 for the 2006 model year [6] as a Chrysler LX platform-based four-door sedan. It shared little with the 1999 Charger concept car.

Initially, the Charger was available in SE, SXT, R/T, R/T with Road/Track Performance Group, Police, and Daytona R/T versions. For the first time, a V6 engine was available, as was all-wheel drive (AWD). All-wheel drive was first only available on the R/T package. However, from 2009 onwards, all-wheel drive was also an option for the SE and SXT versions.[7]

The basic SE model included a 2.7 L V6 engine, 5-speed automatic transmission with "AutoStick" manual shifting feature, 17-inch wheels, air conditioning, all-speed traction control, as well as ABS and electronic stability control, a CD player, tilt and telescoping steering column, power locks/mirrors/windows, and remote keyless entry. Additional features and trims were available, including the Charger R/T with a 5.7 L Hemi V8 mated to a 5-speed automatic transmission. A multiple-displacement system that allowed it to save fuel by running on only four cylinders when cruising was also featured in the V8.

Performance was the focus of the Charger SRT8 equipped with a 6.1 L Hemi engine mated to a 5-speed automatic, as well as conveniences such as an eight-way power front passenger seat, automatic climate control, unique grille and rear spoiler, body-color interior trim, special front fascia and engine cover, larger exhaust tips, performance steering gear, heated front seats with perforated suede inserts, power-adjustable pedals, and unique colors and exterior trim. An optional Road/Track package offered ten additional horsepower, a GPS navigation system, a 322-watt audio system, a sunroof, and a rear-seat DVD entertainment system and radio.

Seventh generation (LD): 2011–present[edit]

2014 Dodge Charger SXT Plus - 100th Anniversary Edition

Main article: Dodge Charger (LX/LD)

The Charger received an improved interior and new exterior styling for 2011. This included new side scoops along both front and rear doors, more angular headlights, aggressive new grille styling, and a more defined and aerodynamic shape overall. Most notably, the back end adopted a more modern wrap-around LED tail light spanning nearly the entire width of the trunk. Driver visibility was improved by more than 15%, addressing complaints from previous years. The side and rear styling cues are reminiscent of the 1968-1970 models.

Base performance was increased, with the 3.5 L 250 hp (186 kW; 253 PS) V6 engine replaced with a Pentastar 3.6 L producing 292 hp (218 kW; 296 PS) @ 6350 rpm and 260 pound force-feet (350 N⋅m) of torque @ 4800 rpm. The 4-speed automatic transmission was replaced with the 5-speed A580 auto.[8][9]

The SRT-8 was not produced for the 2011 model year.

The 2012 year brought a new 8-speed automatic transmission to the V6 model. This year also saw the return of the SRT-8 to the model lineup. AWD was also added to the V6, making AWD available on all but the SRT-8 model.

For the 2012 – 2018 years, the Super Bee platform (Later called Scat Pack 15+) was available, using features seen in regular SRT-8 models with accessories and badges reminiscent of the 60s and 70s muscle car. These included a 6.4 L engine rated at 470 hp (350 kW; 477 PS) and had four-piston Brembo calipers, slotted rotors, paddle shifters, SRT launch features (such as 0-60 timing, Live G-Force readings, and ¼ and ⅛ mile drag timers), custom seat embroidery as well as other features.

The 2014 Pursuit model no longer included chrome exhaust tip extensions, as they often scraped during maneuvers over medians.

For 2015, the Charger received significant exterior styling updates. Most notably, the new front end featured new LED lights and a more aerodynamic nose that was less angled and featured a noticeable curve around the headlight housing. Suspensions, interior, and brakes were also redesigned.

The 2017 model had an upgrade to the 8.4-inch navigation/display system and was restyled due to issues with the previous system.

Except for Charger Pursuit (through 2019), all models came standard with the eight-speed automatic transmission. In January 2014, the AWD Charger Pursuit appeared, and the V8 R/T AWD model disappeared. Sales of the AWD Pursuit increased.

For 2020, the Charger Hellcat comes standard with the "widebody" to accommodate an improved tire/suspension package. Dodge also added a new trim for 2020 called the SRT Hellcat Redeye. The Hellcat Redeye comes standard with the 797 hp (594 kW; 808 PS) V8 engine.[10] The 2020 Charger Pursuit is only available in the RWD V6 and AWD V8 models, with the RWD V8 model being discontinued. Both Pursuit models now feature eight-speed automatic transmissions.

Other models[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^"1964 Dodge Hemi Charger Concept Car". Supercars.net. April 15, 2016. Retrieved October 10, 2019.
  2. ^Auto Editors of Consumer Guide (August 20, 2007). "1964 Dodge Charger". HowStuffWorks.com. Retrieved October 10, 2019.
  3. ^Ernst, Kurt (December 16, 2015). "The (original) Dodge Charger marks its golden anniversary". Hemmings. Retrieved October 10, 2019.
  4. ^"Vehicle Profile: 1968 Dodge Charger". The ClassicCars.com Journal. Retrieved November 21, 2018.
  5. ^Palmer, Jamie (May 2, 2019). "One Of 906! 1968 Slant-Six Dodge Charger". Barn Finds. Retrieved July 7, 2020.
  6. ^"Dodge Charger History - Sixth Generation: 2006 to Present". Edmunds. Retrieved October 6, 2015.
  7. ^"Is The Dodge Charger AWD, RWD, Or FWD? (Explained)". thedriveradviser.com. The Driver Adviser. Retrieved September 18, 2021.
  8. ^"All-new 3.6-litre V-6 Technical Specifications". Chrysler. June 20, 2010. Retrieved August 29, 2010.
  9. ^"3.6-litre V-6 General Specifications"(PDF). Chrysler. February 15, 2011. Archived from the original(PDF) on July 8, 2011. Retrieved February 15, 2011.
  10. ^Niebuhr, Kurt (October 14, 2020). "2021 Dodge Charger Prices, Reviews, and Pictures". Edmunds.com.

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dodge_Charger
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Overview

The 2020 Dodge Charger is the choice for buyers that want or need a full-size sedan but prefer not to compromise on performance or practicality. It's precisely these qualities that have made the Charger lineup so successful over the years. Additionally, the Charger is the only vehicle in its segment with rear-wheel drive and not one, but two, throaty V-8 engines. All models share an excellent eight-speed automatic transmission, but only the V-6 model can be had with optional all-wheel drive. While the Charger lacks some of its competitors' richer interior materials, it makes up for this shortcoming with a superb infotainment system and an engaging driving experience. Between its lively palette of color options and nostalgia-inspiring decals, the Charger is an affordable-performance proposition that's hard to resist.

What's New for 2020?

For 2020, Dodge's Widebody package is now an option on the Scat Pack; widebody cars also receive unique front and rear bumper designs. Scat Pack Chargers with the Widebody package come standard with three-mode adaptive Bilstein dampers. Opting for the Widebody package also carries over the brakes and rotors from the Hellcat and 20- x 11-inch wheels wrapped with wider tires. Throughout the lineup, Dodge has added myriad wheel options, with names such as Devil's Rim and Warp Speed, and Brass Monkey. Buyers looking to further customize the looks of their Charger can opt for the Satin Black Appearance package that covers the hood, roof, decklid, and spoiler. For those wanting to spruce up the interior, Dodge is now offering a Carbon and Suede package that adds real carbon-fiber accents to the instrument panel and console, as well as the addition of faux suede to the headliner, visors, and front roof pillars. Rounding out changes for 2020 are three new paint colors: Frostbite, Hellraisin, and Sinamon.

Pricing and Which One to Buy:

If it were our coin, we'd go with the Scat Pack: its mighty 6.4-liter V-8 produces 485 horsepower. Although it's a premium of roughly $4000 versus the lesser R/T trim, it more than makes up for it in looks and performance. Additionally, fuel economy is nearly identical, so unless you're on a tight budget there'd be no reason not to splurge for the Scat Pack. Our only additional options would be the Plus Group package that includes niceties such as leather and faux-suede seats, a power-adjustable steering column, blind-spot detection, heated rear seats, and extra interior lighting.

Engine, Transmission, and Performance

The Charger channels its NASCAR roots with big V-8 power and rowdy sounds. However, not every Charger has a mighty Hemi V-8 under the hood—what a pity—but they do all share an excellent eight-speed automatic transmission and standard rear-wheel drive. In contrast, the V-6 is rather subdued but does add the availability of all-wheel drive. Dodge doesn't build a Charger with a manual gearbox, but it would be so much cooler if it did. The standard V-6 is no slouch, yet it lacks the giddy-up of front-drivers such as the Nissan Maxima and the Buick LaCrosse. The more powerful versions excel at the strip, where the 485-hp Charger R/T Scat Pack posted an impressive 4.1-second sprint to 60 mph. The 370-hp Charger has enough ponies to outrun most family sedans. The bright (Green Go) Charger we paraded around town had a quiet and composed ride. Its large 20-inch wheels were relaxed on most surfaces, but obstacles such as railroad crossings and potholes disrupted its composure. The big-bodied sedan was remarkably balanced when cornering, too. Although the V-6 version we tested had nearly identical cornering grip, the Daytona's hefty horsepower advantage amplified the fun. The electrically assisted power steering contributes to the Charger's purposeful control, but its feedback is too heavy and slow to be engaging. We've tested several Chargers for emergency braking, and the best results came from the high-performance models with upgraded brakes and stickier summer performance tires.

Fuel Economy and Real-World MPG

The Charger is a big, heavy car with a healthy appetite for fuel. Although it has below-average EPA estimates in the city, it has fairly competitive highway ratings. We haven't tested the V-6 version or the 485-hp V-8 on our highway fuel-economy loop, but the 5.7-liter V-8 engine exceeded its 25-mpg estimate by 1 mpg.

Interior, Comfort, and Cargo

The Charger's interior is highly functional yet the opposite of luxurious, with more rubberized materials than the set of an adult film. Apart from excellent rear-seat legroom, its passenger space is slightly below average. The cabin's simplistic design is classic muscle car, but options are plentiful. Although its trunk volume is similar to those of most rivals, the Charger was able to fit an extra carry-on box than its rivals. It held 18 total with the rear seat stowed, beating the Maxima and the fastback-hatchback Kia Stinger by three. Its center console features plenty of spots for small items and a slot alongside the shifter that is perfect for storing your smartphone.

Infotainment and Connectivity

Every Challenger has a version of the excellent Uconnect infotainment system. That means standard Apple CarPlay and Android Auto as part of a 7.0-inch or 8.4-inch touchscreen. Although the system we tested elicited good response times, some optional controls can only be accessed via the touchscreen; a Wi-Fi hotspot also is unavailable.

Safety and Driver-Assistance Features

The modern-day Charger has a host of optional high-tech assists, including adaptive cruise control and automated emergency braking. However, these features cost extra, and base models are excluded from the most advanced driver-assistance options. The Charger earned a five-star crash-test rating from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), but its scores from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) were average. Key safety features include:

  • Available blind-spot monitoring and rear cross-traffic alert
  • Available lane-departure warning and lane-keeping assist
  • Available forward-collision warning

Warranty and Maintenance Coverage

The Charger has an average warranty that lacks complimentary scheduled maintenance.

  • Limited warranty covers 3 years or 36,000 miles
  • Powertrain warranty covers 5 years or 60,000 miles
  • No complimentary scheduled maintenance
Sours: https://www.caranddriver.com/dodge/charger-2020
Does the 2020 Dodge Charger SXT have ENOUGH power or just BUY a Charger R/T?

New Dodge Charger for Sale in San Diego, CA

Disclaimer:

Sale Price includes a Factory Rebate if applicable on this vehicle and is valid on a cash or financed (through Chrysler Capital) purchase only by an individual for their personal use. The sale price does not apply to a lease. The Factory Rebates may not be available on this vehicle if you elect to take advantage of a Special Alternative APR or Special Lease program. Some Factory Rebates are California Resident specific and may vary for residents of other states. NO sales to Dealers, Brokers or Exporters. Prices are plus government fees and taxes. We make every effort to provide accurate information, but please verify before purchasing. Leasing & financing available on approved credit. Sales Price does not include dealer installed products,$1,295 security system and$495 clear shield.  Prices, discounts, rebates and incentives shown are for retail sales only. Lease incentives available upon request.  All sale prices expire at the close of business each day.

**With approved credit. Terms may vary. Monthly payments are only estimates derived from the vehicle price with a 72 month term, 4.9% interest and 20% downpayment.

Prop 65


You deserve to step behind the wheel of a car that makes you feel limitless, which is why you should check out the 2021 Dodge Charger. This exhilarating sports sedan can be found here at Kearny Mesa Chrysler Dodge Jeep® RAM in our lineup of new Dodge cars. Visit us today to get filled in on what makes this icon of American muscle so exciting and to hit the road for a test drive!

 

2021 Dodge Charger Model Details

Between the sharp LED headlamps and available sporty features like functioning air-intakes, this muscle car proudly displays thrilling style.

 

Things get even more exciting when you open up the doors and step inside. The sleek cabin features available performance seats with luxurious leather along with available carbon fiber accents.

 

Built to deliver world-class performance, the 2021 Dodge Charger features a sport-tuned suspension and performance brakes for a genuine sports car experience. You can step up to available Adaptive Damping Suspension and Brembo® racing brakes for even more precision on the road.

 

Offering standard rear-wheel drive and available all-wheel drive, you will get an exhilarating handling experience no matter which 2021 Dodge Charger model you choose.

 

The starting 3.6-liter Pentastar® V6 engine creates a potent 292 horsepower, resulting in a responsive burst of acceleration. You can also work your way up to the available 6.2-liter HEMI® High-Output Hellcat Redeye V8 engine, which creates up to 797 horsepower for a 0-60 mph time of just 3.6 seconds.

 

Safety and Special Features

Packed with sleek technology features, like a 7-inch digital information cluster and an infotainment touchscreen display, the 2021 Dodge Charger, offers a fully modern interior experience. You can even explore the Performance Pages in the infotainment system to get a look at your driving stats.

 

This powerful sports car also includes plenty of available driver-assist features to make each time behind the wheel safer, such as adaptive cruise control and blind-spot monitoring.

Buying a 2021 Dodge Charger

When you visit our San Diego Dodge dealership, we’ll get right to work helping you find the perfect sports car for you. You can also count on us to help you with Dodge financing or any other part of the car-buying process. Visit us today to get behind the wheel of your next thrilling muscle car!

Sours: https://www.kearnymesacdjr.com/new-vehicles/charger/

Hatchback 2020 charger

Odd couple: Audi S5 Sportback vs. Dodge Charger Scat Pack Plus

My comparison cars this week have much in common. They are muscle models from notable performance brands. They bear fresh, head-swiveling colors: one District Green, the other Sinamon Stick red. Both have elegant “T” shifters, sculpted 20-inch wheels, elevated sticker prices and multiple words in their badges.

Yet the stunning Audi S5 Sportback and Dodge Charger Scat Pack Plus will rarely be cross-shopped.

The interior of the 2020 Audi S5 Sportback is a pleasant place to be with quilted leather seats, digital screens and a T-shifter.

Despite their focus on raw speed, their branding is aimed at entirely different customers. They are monuments to sales savvy, of the ability of marketing geniuses to conjure emotion for sheet metal. If they appeared in the movie "Caddyshack," the Audi would be driven by Chevy Chase and the Charger by Rodney Dangerfield.

True to those stereotypes, these two hot rods satisfy their customers in dramatically different ways while arriving at 60 mph at the same time: just over 4 seconds.

After flogging them all over Michigan, I found them as divergent as German chocolate and American apple pie with a big scoop of ice cream.

The S5 Sportback is the performance version of the A5 Sportback, one of the most elegant designs in autodom. An offspring of the A7, which combines hatchback utility with fastback sex appeal, the compact-sized A5 is a class smaller while giving away little in the beauty department.

The 2020 Audi S5 Sportback is positioned between the standard Audi A5 and the full-blown Audi RS5.

My S5 swan manages to be even more alluring than the standard A5. Credit its color — as irresistible as Jaguar’s British Racing Green — shard-spoked wheels, blacked-out grille and mirror caps, quad pipes. It turned a lot of heads across Oakland County.

But its performance was more understated, matching its buttoned-up clientele. Under the hood was a 349-horse turbocharged V-6 — a nice step up from the standard A5’s 228-horse turbo-4, but shy of the ultimate, 444-horse six-shooter in the RS5 Sportback. Like the Cadillac CT5-V I recently tested, the S5 aims to find that performance sweet spot between boulevard cruiser and track monster.

Made in America (almost). The 2020 Dodge Charger Scat Pack Plus is actually assembled in Canada.

Its behavior is sweet, too. Not too tart, not too bland. Fire it up and the Audi authoritatively clears its throat like the host of a formal meal. I punched the Drive Mode to Dynamic (Comfort, Auto and Individual are also available), and the driveline subtly firmed with a dab of rev match on downshifts. Bravo, sir.

Not the Charger.

Turn the key — SNORRT! — and it’ll wake the neighbors (“What is that noise you’re driving?” asked mine). Growling at idle it sounds like a T. rex that hasn’t been fed for a week. If the Audi is eye-catching, then the Charger is in-your-face. The standard Charger is menacing enough, but Scat Pack turns the dial to 11. The front end is littered with air intakes, topped off by a big ice cream — er — hood scoop.

The fenders are swollen with Dodge’s Widebody treatment, like biceps from obsessive gym workouts. Charger is tattooed with badges — a Scat Pack Super Bee in the front grille, “392-Hemi” on its flanks.

The 2020 Audi S5 Sportback features a 3.0-liter turbo-6 mill that sends 349 horsepower to all four wheels. Expect a bit of turbo lag before it kicks in.

That 392 means 392 cubic inches — 6.4 liters of V-8 muscle — which is the Scat Pack’s secret sauce. Like the S5 Sportback, the 392 is middle ground between the standard V-6 Charger and the insane 707-horse Charger SRT Hellcat which starts at the same price as the Audi S5 ($69,000) and will turn your hair white with its off-the-charts power and demonic supercharger whine at full throttle.

With 485 horsepower and 475 pound-feet of torque, Scat Pack packs plenty of punch.

Prowling the M-32 two-lane west of Gaylord, Michigan, the big V-8’s power was instantly accessible when needed. WAAAUUURRGGH! ... and I was past slower traffic in the blink of an eye. The eight-speed transmission clicked off quick shifts while the speedo approached triple digits. The sound was deafening, my goosebumps an inch high.

The Audi’s eight-speed automatic is also silky smooth, but the engine exhibits noticeable turbo lag before its 349 ponies hooked up for quick passes. The American V-8 is an endangered species, long live the American V-8.

The big, 20-inch wheels on the 2020 Dodge Charger Scat Pack Plus.

Through the twisty bits the mid-size A5 antelope is noticeably lighter, more agile. The Audi is aided by all-wheel drive which helps put down traction on corner exit. It tips the scales at a porky 3,925 pounds — but that’s still 400 pounds lighter than the full-size rear-wheel drive Charger elephant.

Jump in the elephant after the antelope and it’s noticeably more physical. But thanks to modern electronics — and a Scat Pack full of suspension upgrades — Charger is remarkably nimble at speed. The Widebody mod adds 3.5-inches of track width for better stability and fat Pirelli P-Zeros increase confidence with very corner.

With all 485 horses fed through the rear wheels, power application requires more care than the Audi. Charger’s electronic Mode selector tweaks suspension and powertrain dynamics to suit your style. I preferred Individual mode, tuning everything to Track (the steering is magnificent) while leaving the traction-control on to manage torque.

Based on the Audi A5 sedan, the 2020 Audi S5 Sportback is a gorgeous sculpture in District Green with on-demand power and a utilitarian hatchback.

Its remarkable to have these electronic gizmos at your fingertips in a Dodge — same as a German chariot. It’s a big reason the gap between luxury and mainstream has shrunk so dramatically over the last decade.

That and the interior. The Audi cockpit is a lovely place to spend time, but so is the Dodge. Both have consoles wrapped in carbon-fiber trim. Both have Alcantara/leather thrones and useful cubby space. Audi’s premium appeal is in its digital displays which I always geek out over: configurable screens, Google Earth behind the steering wheel ... oooooh.

But on trips, I used Android Auto in both cars. The Audi’s nav system isn’t up to speed with smartphones so Google Maps takes over its fancy center screen. Same as Charger.

With its T-shifter, digital UConnect infotainment and healthy storage space, the 2020 Dodge Charger Scat Pack Plus interior is ergonomically efficient.

The Audi’s interior is more serene thanks to its more, um, gentlemanly engine note. But if your passengers don’t mind that, the Charger gives 'em 5 more inches of rear leg space (35 vs. 40 inches). The S5 strikes back with its yuge cargo bay which, thanks to its hatchback design, gains 5 cubic feet of space (21.8 vs. 16.5) over Dodge.

Hatches are one of my favorite things — but they’ll cost ya given their extra engineering. On such little things do these utilitarian muscle cars differ.

But the yawning marketing gap remains. Turbo-6 vs. V-8. Audi vs. Dodge. Violin vs. electric guitar. I think Chevy Chase and Rodney Dangerfield will be very happy with their choices.

The 2020 Audi S5 Sportback is a size smaller than the Audi A7 Sportback that established Audi as a leading design brand.

2020 Audi S5 Sportback

Vehicle type: Front-engine, five-passenger performance hatchback

Price: $52,895, including $995 destination fee ($69,240 as tested)

Powerplant: 3.0-liter, turbocharged V-6

 Power: 349 horsepower, 369 pound-feet of torque

Transmission: 8-speed automatic

Performance: 0-60 mph, 4.2 seconds (Car and Driver); top speed, 155 mph

Weight: 3,925 pounds 

Fuel economy: EPA, 20 mpg city/27 highway/23 combined 

Report card

Highs: Sleek bod; excellent hatchback utility

Lows: Gets pricey; nav system still not up to Google Maps standard

Overall: 3 stars

The 2020 Dodge Charger Scat Pack Plus packs serious, 485-horse heat wrapped in a muscular body that includes Widebody fenders for 2020.

2020 Dodge Charger Scat Pack Plus

Vehicle type: Front-engine, five-passenger performance sedan

Price: $41,990 including $1,495 destination fee ($54,065 as tested)

Powerplant: 6.4-liter V-8

 Power: 485 horsepower, 475 pound-feet of torque

Transmission: 8-speed automatic

Performance: 0-60 mph, 4.3 seconds (mfr.); top speed, 175 mph

Weight: 4,373 pounds 

Fuel economy: EPA, 15 mpg city/24 highway/18 combined 

Report card

Highs: Family muscle car; great soundtrack

Lows: Heavy; drinks fuel

Overall: 4 stars

Henry Payne is auto critic for The Detroit News. Find him at [email protected] or Twitter @HenryEPayne.

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Sours: https://www.detroitnews.com/story/opinion/columnists/henry-payne/2020/07/30/review-audi-s-5-sportback-vs-dodge-charger-scat-pack-plus-test/5519747002/
TUNER PROFILE: Bo's E210 2020 Toyota Corolla Hatchback

Overview

The 2022 Dodge Charger has the distinction of being the only V-8-powered sedan that starts under $40,000. While the Chrysler 300 also offers a V-8 with a rear-wheel-drive layout, it's fancier and pricier. The Charger is less refined, with questionable interior quality and an overly firm ride that gets worse on the optional 20-inch wheels. As with the Dodge Challenger coupe, it has a standard V-6 and available all-wheel drive. However, the most exciting Charger has a vociferous Hemi V-8 under the hood, either a 370-hp 5.7-liter or a 485-hp 6.4-liter. The latter is reserved for the Scat Pack model, which isn't as aggro as the separately reviewed 700-plus-hp Charger SRT Hellcat, but it is the sportiest non-SRT model and offers a distinctive widebody appearance. Although not everyone will appreciate the 2022 Charger, anyone who wants a throwback sedan with countless nostalgic character will.

What's New for 2022?

For 2022, Dodge makes only small changes to the Charger lineup. The Driver Convenience Group package now includes a deluxe security alarm, which should come in handy in the event that anyone tries to boost (read: steal) an owner's prized ride. The alarm is also now standard on Scat Pack models, too.

Pricing and Which One to Buy

We think the Charger R/T, with its 370-hp 5.7-liter V-8, has the perfect mix of power and features. Those who want all-wheel drive are limited to the V-6 versions. The bigger 485-hp V-8 that comes with the Scat Pack makes accelerating great again but costs about $5000 more than the R/T. Along with a standard 8.4-inch Uconnect touchscreen with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, our choice includes a throbbing dual-mode exhaust, a leather-wrapped performance steering wheel, and 20-inch rims. We'd also add the Driver Convenience Group (blind-spot monitor, rear cross-traffic alert, heated exterior mirrors, and upgraded headlights) and the Performance Handling Group (20-inch wheels with all-season performance tires, Brembo brakes, and sport-tuned suspension).

Engine, Transmission, and Performance

The Charger channels its NASCAR roots with big V-8 power and rowdy sounds. However, not every Charger has a mighty Hemi V-8 under the hood—what a pity—but they do all share an excellent eight-speed automatic transmission and standard rear-wheel drive. In contrast, the V-6 is subdued but does add the availability of all-wheel drive. Dodge doesn't build a Charger with a manual gearbox, but it would be so much cooler if it did. The standard V-6 is no slouch, yet it lacks the giddy-up of front-drivers such as the Nissan Maxima. The more powerful versions excel at the strip, where the 485-hp Charger R/T Scat Pack posted an impressive 3.8-second sprint to 60 mph. The 370-hp Charger has enough ponies to outrun most family sedans. The bright (Green Go) Charger we paraded around town had a quiet and composed ride. Its large 20-inch wheels were relaxed on most surfaces, but obstacles such as railroad crossings and potholes disrupted its composure. The big-bodied sedan was remarkably balanced when cornering, too. Although the V-6 version we tested had nearly identical cornering grip, the Daytona's hefty horsepower advantage amplified the fun. The electrically assisted power steering contributes to the Charger's purposeful control, but its feedback is too heavy and slow to be engaging. We've tested several Chargers for emergency braking, and the best results came from the high-performance models with upgraded brakes and stickier summer performance tires.

Fuel Economy and Real-World MPG

The Charger is a big, heavy car with a healthy appetite for fuel. Although it has below-average EPA estimates in the city, it has fairly competitive highway ratings. While we haven't tested the 5.7-liter V-8 on our 75-mph real-world fuel-economy route, which is part of our extensive testing regimen, we have tested the V-6 with all-wheel drive and the larger 485-hp V-8. Surprisingly, both engines were within 1 mpg of each other, with the six earning 26 mpg on the highway and the eight earning 25 mpg. For more information about the Charger's fuel economy, visit the EPA's website.

Interior, Comfort, and Cargo

The Charger's interior is highly functional yet the opposite of luxurious, with more rubberized materials than the set of an adult film. Apart from excellent rear-seat legroom, its passenger space is slightly below average. The cabin's simplistic design is classic muscle car, but options are plentiful. Although its trunk volume is similar to those of most rivals, the Charger was able to fit an extra carry-on box than its rivals. It held 18 total with the rear seat stowed, beating the Maxima and the fastback-hatchback Kia Stinger by three. Its center console features plenty of spots for small items and a slot alongside the shifter that is perfect for storing your smartphone.

Infotainment and Connectivity

Every Challenger has a version of the excellent Uconnect infotainment system. That means standard Apple CarPlay and Android Auto as part of a 7.0-inch or 8.4-inch touchscreen. Although the system we tested elicited good response times, some optional controls can only be accessed via the touchscreen; a Wi-Fi hotspot also is unavailable.

Safety and Driver-Assistance Features

The big Dodge sedan does offer a host of driver-assistance technology, including adaptive cruise control and automated emergency braking. However, those features cost extra, and base models are excluded from the most advanced options. For more information about the Charger's crash-test results, visit the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) websites. Key safety features include:

  • Available blind-spot monitoring and rear cross-traffic alert
  • Available lane-departure warning and lane-keeping assist
  • Available forward-collision warning

Warranty and Maintenance Coverage

Dodge provides an average limited and powertrain warranty set that aligns with the Maxima's coverage, but the Kia Cadenza has a significantly longer powertrain warranty and the Toyota Avalon offers complimentary maintenance.

  • Limited warranty covers three years or 36,000 miles
  • Powertrain warranty covers five years or 60,000 miles
  • No complimentary scheduled maintenance

Specifications

Specifications:

VEHICLE TYPE: front-engine, all-wheel-drive, 5-passenger, 4-door sedan

PRICE AS TESTED: $41,325 (base price: $34,340)

ENGINE TYPE: DOHC 24-valve V-6, aluminum block and heads, port fuel injection

Displacement: 220 cu in, 3604 cc
Power: 300 hp @ 6350 rpm
Torque: 264 lb-ft @ 4800 rpm

TRANSMISSION: 8-speed automatic with manual shifting mode

CHASSIS:
Suspension (F/R): control arms/multilink
Brakes (F/R): 13.6-in vented disc/12.6-in vented disc
Tires: Michelin Primacy MXM4, 235/55R-19 101H M+S

DIMENSIONS:
Wheelbase: 120.2 in
Length: 198.4 in
Width: 75.0 in Height: 58.2 in
Passenger volume: 102 cu ft
Trunk volume: 17 cu ft
Curb weight: 4281 lb

C/D TEST RESULTS:
Zero to 60 mph: 6.4 sec
Zero to 100 mph: 16.6 sec
Zero to 130 mph: 35.0 sec
Rolling start, 5–60 mph: 6.8 sec
Top gear, 30–50 mph: 4.1 sec
Top gear, 50–70 mph: 5.1 sec
Standing ¼-mile: 14.9 sec @ 95 mph
Top speed (governor limited): 132 mph
Braking, 70–0 mph: 176 ft
Roadholding, 300-ft-dia skidpad: 0.79 g

C/D FUEL ECONOMY:
Observed: 20 mpg
75-mph highway driving: 26 mpg
Highway range: 480 mi

EPA FUEL ECONOMY:
Combined/city/highway: 21/18/27 mpg

>>CLICK TO DOWNLOAD TEST SHEET<<

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More Features and Specs

Sours: https://www.caranddriver.com/dodge/charger

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