Physics for the sciences rutgers

Physics for the sciences rutgers DEFAULT

Introductory Courses

The department offers several general introductory sequences, as well as some nontechnical courses listed in the following section. Courses 01:750:271-272, 273 Honors Physics with 275-276 Classical Physics Laboratory are for honors students and well-prepared physics majors. It uses calculus as a pre- or corequisite. Courses 01:750:123-124, 227-228 Analytical Physics with 229-230 Analytical Physics Laboratory are for engineering students and physics majors. It uses calculus as a pre- or corequisite. Engineering students who need extra help or who have nontraditional backgrounds should ask the engineering dean's office for permission to take 01:750: 115-116 Extended Analytical Physics instead of 01:750:123-124. There are three introductory sequences for majors in the biological sciences (including premedical curricula), computer science, chemistry, and other sciences, as well as for students who desire an elementary but thorough introduction to physics. All three cover basically the same material, but utilize different teaching techniques and require different levels of mathematical preparation. Courses 01:750:203-204 General Physics with 205-206 General Physics Laboratory require calculus as a pre- or corequisite, and use a lecture/recitation format. Courses 01:750:201-202 Extended General Physics are intended for students who need extra help or who have nontraditional backgrounds. Recitations are replaced by cooperative learning workshops, and a laboratory is integrated into the course. Courses 01:750:193-194 Physics for the Sciences use only algebra and trigonometry. Recitations are replaced by cooperative learning workshops, and a laboratory is integrated into the course. Course 01:750:161 Elements of Physics is a one-term noncalculus course intended primarily for pharmacy students, but also suitable for well-prepared liberal arts majors. Courses that are suitable for nonscientists, requiring only high-school algebra, include 01:750:109,110 Astronomy and Cosmology, 01:750:140 The Greenhouse Effect, and 01:750:296 Great Ideas That Shook Physics and the World.

Students who are unsure which sequence to take are urged to consult an adviser in the physics department. Credit cannot be given for courses taken in different sequences if they cover substantially similar topics. Students who wish to switch from one sequence to another are urged�to consult a departmental adviser; students who change their major or who have advanced standing also are urged to consult a departmental adviser.

Sours: https://catalogs.rutgers.edu/generated/nb-ug_0507/pg20659.html

Course Synopses

01:750:106. CONCEPTS OF PHYSICS FOR HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCE STUDENTS (3)

  • Course Description:
    Not for credit towards physics or astrophysics major or minor.

    Concepts of physics and astronomy in their scientific, social, historical, and current technological context, with no mathematical problem-solving. How the physical universe works, from mechanics and the solar system to relativity, quantum behavior, and the Big Bang. Contributions of scientists from Aristotle, Galileo, and Newton through Einstein, Bohr and up to the present time.

    There are NO prerequisites for this course:

    • Familiarity with basic arithmetic, and simple high-school level algebra will be assumed.
    • Homework and exams will be minimally quantitative, but students will be expected to write short paragraph answers.
  • Learning Management System: https://sakai.rutgers.edu/portal/directtool/8c37b542-5db8-4380-8553-84ade0fce1d3/

01:750:109. ASTRONOMY AND COSMOLOGY (3)

  • Course Description:
    No prerequisite. For nonscience majors. May not be taken for physics or astrophysics major or minor credit. Courses are independent and may be taken in either order or concurrently.

    A predominantly descriptive introduction to current ideas concerning the nature and origin of the earth, the solar system, the galaxy, and the universe; neutron stars and black holes; the "big-bang"; the possibility of life outside the earth. 109: Development of our understanding of the solar system from the time of the Greeks to the present day. 110: Current understanding of stars, galaxies and the universe.

    Readings: The weekly reading assignments from the book are listed on the syllabus and should be /completed before the corresponding lectures. Additional reading assignments from the web will be in the lecture notes.

    Homework: Complete Homework questions must be submitted before 12:00 noon on Date Due (see above). Homework will be assigned in Sakai on a roughly weekly basis, and will be due before the start of class on Friday. Assignments will consist of multiple choice questions that assess your understanding of material covered by the previous week's lectures and assigned reading. Solutions will be posted later on Fridays. Your one lowest homework score will be dropped in computing your semester average.

  • Learning Management System: http://www.physics.rutgers.edu/~croft/A109-19.html

01:750:110. ASTRONOMY AND COSMOLOGY (3)

  • Course Description:
    No prerequisite. For nonscience majors. May not be taken for major credit. Courses are independent and may be taken in either order or concurrently.

    A predominantly descriptive introduction to current ideas concerning the nature and origin of the earth, the solar system, the galaxy, and the universe; neutron stars and black holes; the "big-bang"; the possibility of life outside the earth. 109: Development of our understanding of the solar system from the time of the Greeks to the present day. 110: Current understanding of stars, galaxies and the universe.

  • Learning Management System: https://www.physics.rutgers.edu/ugrad/110

01:750:115. EXTENDED ANALYTICAL PHYSICS I (3)

  • Course Description:
    Lec. 2 hrs., workshop 3 hrs. Corequisites: 01:640:112 or 115 (first term), 01:640:CALC1 (second term). Sequence 01:750:115-116 is equivalent to 01:750:123-124, if both 01:750:115 and 116 are taken. Intended for engineering students who need extra help in preparing for 01:750:227-228.

    Together with 01:750:227-228 forms a thorough introductory sequence. First term: graphs, orders of magnitude, units, dimensions, errors and precision, review of mathematics useful to physics, kinematics, vectors, force and Newton's laws. Second term: energy, momentum, rotational motion, oscillations, liquids, and thermal physics, including the laws of thermodynamics and the kinetic theory of gases.

    Course information, announcements, and resources are all on our Canvas website: canvas.rutgers.edu. Please be sure to check Canvas often for the latest updates.

  • Learning Management System: https://www.physics.rutgers.edu/ugrad/115

01:750:116. EXTENDED ANALYTICAL PHYSICS I (3)

  • Course Description:
    Lec. 2 hrs., workshop 3 hrs. Corequisites: 01:640:112 or 115 (first term), 01:640:CALC1 (second term). Sequence 01:750:115-116 is equivalent to 01:750:123-124, if both 01:750:115 and 116 are taken. Intended for engineering students who need extra help in preparing for 01:750:227-228.

    Together with 01:750:227-228 forms a thorough introductory sequence. First term: graphs, orders of magnitude, units, dimensions, errors and precision, review of mathematics useful to physics, kinematics, vectors, force and Newton's laws. Second term: energy, momentum, rotational motion, oscillations, liquids, and thermal physics, including the laws of thermodynamics and the kinetic theory of gases.

    Extended Analytical Physics is a course that was created as an alternative to Analytical Physics I, the first year of introductory physics for engineering students. It is equivalent to Analytical Physics I (Physics 123/4) but offers more diverse teaching methods, more instructor contact hours and a smaller class setting. The design of the course is based in our belief that science is best learned in the way that science is done in real life -- highly active, experimental, and open-ended.

  • Learning Management System: https://onlinelearning.rutgers.edu/canvas

01:750:120. RESEARCH METHODS IN X-RAY ASTROPHYSICS (3)

  • Course Description:
    Prerequisite: 01:640:112 or higher or placement.
    Course to have a substantial online component.

    Methods for investigating stellar parameters, stellar evolutions, and x-ray sources, using NASA archives on the Internet.

    The subject matter for this course will be divided into two components: the first is a general introduction to the physics and astronomy information you will need to understand basic phenomena that occur in the realm of x-ray astrophysics; the second is the presentation of authentic satellite data from various exciting types of x-ray sources, which you will analyze to better understand the working of the high-energy Universe in which we live. There are no prerequistes for this course, other than high-school mathematics (algebra and trigonometry), although pre-calc might be helpful. It is a 3-credit hour course, and appears as a "regular" course on your transcript, with a standard grade. Material and assignments will be given on a weekly basis, and you can work on the class at any time. You will have no conflicts with any courses on your schedule! If you have any questions, you can e-mail me at: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

  • Learning Management System: http://www.physics.rutgers.edu/ugrad/120/

01:750:123. ANALYTICAL PHYSICS I (2)

  • Course Description:
    Lec. 1 hr., rec. 1 hr. Corequisite: 01:640:151-152. Primarily for engineering and physics majors. This course should be followed by 01:750:227-228 (or 204 if changing major).

    Forms a thorough introductory sequence together with 01:750:227-228. Kinematics, dynamics, energy, momentum, angular momentum, heat, and kinetic theory.

    Honors version 123H with separate lecture and recitations available for students enrolled in an honors program.

    Lec. 1 hr., rec. 1 hr. Co-requisites: 01:640:151-152.

    Primarily for engineering and physics majors. This course should be followed by 01:750:227, 228 (or 204 if changing major)

     

  • Learning Management System: https://canvas.rutgers.edu

01:750:124. ANALYTICAL PHYSICS I (2)

  • Course Description:
    Lec. 1 hr., rec. 1 hr. Corequisite: 01:640:151-152. Primarily for engineering and physics majors. This course should be followed by 01:750:227-228 (or 204 if changing major).

    Forms a thorough introductory sequence together with 01:750:227-228. Kinematics, dynamics, energy, momentum, angular momentum, heat, and kinetic theory.

    How to Study for this Course: From experience we know that, in order to be successful in this class, consistent weekly effort is required on your part. You need to "socialize" the material, to turn it around in your own mind, to get acquainted with it in several ways. Try also to study with friends. Through discussions with others, you will understand the material in a deeper way. Do not hesitate to contact your instructors, but do this as early as possible. Most things we can help you with, if we know about them early, but there is often little we can do if you wait until a few days before the common hour exams or the final. Above all, solve the assigned exercises, and when you have done all those, do some more!

  • Learning Management System: http://www.physics.rutgers.edu/ugrad/124/

01:750:140. THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT (3)

  • Course Description:
    For nonscience majors; may not be taken for major credit in science and engineering. Credit not given for both this course and 01:160:140, 01:450:140, or 01:556:140.

    The physical and chemical bases of the "greenhouse effect" and its global impact: biological, climatic, economic, and political. Reducing the emission of "greenhouse" gases; nuclear energy, and other alternative energy sources.

    In this class, we'll discuss the basics of the greenhouse effect for a non-technical audience.  A key goal of the course is that the students develop the energy literacy and quantitative dexterity necessary to evaluate for themselves arguments presented in public policy discussions of global warming and climate change.   We will take advantage of our Active Learning Classroom setting to encourage group interdisciplinary discussions, problem-solving and guessestimation exercises whenever possible.

  • Learning Management System: http://www.physics.rutgers.edu/ugrad/140/

01:750:161. ELEMENTS OF PHYSICS (4)

  • Course Description:
    Lec. 3 hrs., workshop/lab 3 hrs. Prerequisite: 01:640:112 or 115. Primarily for pharmacy students, but suitable for well-prepared liberal arts majors.

    Survey of major topics in physics, such as motion, fluids, waves, electricity, electrical circuits, radioactivity, relativity, and atomic structure, with emphasis on developing laboratory and problem-solving skills.

    Web Site:  You must regularly check our physics 161 course home page.  Important announcements about homework, laboratory/workshop, exams, etc. will be posted there. 

  • Learning Management System: http://www.physics.rutgers.edu/ugrad/161/

01:750:193. PHYSICS FOR THE SCIENCES (4)

  • Course Description:
    Lec. 2 hrs., workshop 1.5 hrs., lab. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: 01:640:112 or 115 or equivalent.

    Introduction to physics with biological, ecological, and chemical applications. Selected topics in mechanics, thermodynamics, fluids, waves, electricity, magnetism, optics, and modern physics. Integrated laboratory experiments.

  • Learning Management System: https://canvas.rutgers.edu/

01:750:194. PHYSICS FOR THE SCIENCES (4)

  • Course Description:
    Lec. 2 hrs., workshop 1.5 hrs., lab. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: 01:640:112 or 115 or equivalent.

    Introduction to physics with biological, ecological, and chemical applications. Selected topics in mechanics, thermodynamics, fluids, waves, electricity, magnetism, optics, and modern physics. Integrated laboratory experiments.

  • Learning Management System: https://canvas.rutgers.edu/

01:750:201. EXTENDED GENERAL PHYSICS (5)

  • Course Description:
    Two 80-min. lecs., one 80-min. workshop, lab. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: 01:640:112 or 115 (first term); Corequisite: 01:640:CALC1 (second term); or permission of instructor. Sequence 01:750:201-202 is an integrated program equivalent to 01:750:203-204 and 205-206. Intended for science, science teaching, and pre-health profession majors with a nontraditional background or who would benefit from additional support.

    Elementary but detailed analysis of fundamental topics. First term: review of mathematical skills useful for physics, vectors, kinematics, Newton's laws including gravitation, conservation laws, fluids, thermal physics. Second term: electricity and magnetism, geometrical and wave optics, relativity and modern physics.

    The course 201-202 is equivalent to both Physics 203-204 and 205-206 (laboratory). It fulfills all the physics requirements for science majors, as well as admission to health profession schools and graduate schools.

    Students admitted to Physics 201-202 have an opportunity to learn physics with additional class time, smaller sections, and an innovative and integrated learning environment. We expect all students to do well in this course. You will need to spend at least as much time out of class as in class on the material described in the syllabus. We also recommend that you form study groups. Often it helps to work with other people. Bouncing ideas and questions off each other may clear things up - and there's often someone experienced around to ask if you really get stuck.

    This course requires us to have a good understanding to some simple math such as vectors, simple derivatives, trigonometry etc.... 

    All this means: If you aren't fairly firm in math (algebra and trigonometry), this may look hard at times. You will need to invest a lot of time doing problems, studying and getting help particularly if you haven't had any Physics in high school or college before.

  • Learning Management System: http://egp.rutgers.edu/201/

01:750:202. EXTENDED GENERAL PHYSICS (5)

  • Course Description:
    Two 80-min. lecs., one 80-min. workshop, lab. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: 01:640:112 or 115 (first term); Corequisite: 01:640:CALC1 (second term); or permission of instructor. Sequence 01:750:201-202 is an integrated program equivalent to 01:750:203-204 and 205-206. Intended for science, science teaching, and pre-health profession majors with a nontraditional background or who would benefit from additional support.

    Elementary but detailed analysis of fundamental topics. First term: review of mathematical skills useful for physics, vectors, kinematics, Newton's laws including gravitation, conservation laws, fluids, thermal physics. Second term: electricity and magnetism, geometrical and wave optics, relativity and modern physics.

    The course 201-202 is equivalent to both Physics 203-204 and 205-206 (laboratory). It fulfills all the physics requirements for science majors, as well as admission to health profession schools and graduate schools.

    Students admitted to Physics 201-202 have an opportunity to learn physics with additional class time, smaller sections, and an innovative and integrated learning environment. We expect all students to do well in this course. You will need to spend at least as much time out of class as in class on the material described in the syllabus. We also recommend that you form study groups. Often it helps to work with other people. Bouncing ideas and questions off each other may clear things up - and there's often someone experienced around to ask if you really get stuck.

    This course requires us to have a good understanding to some simple math such as vectors, simple derivatives, trigonometry etc.... 

    All this means: If you aren't fairly firm in math (algebra and trigonometry), this may look hard at times. You will need to invest a lot of time doing problems, studying and getting help particularly if you haven't had any Physics in high school or college before.

  • Learning Management System: http://egp.rutgers.edu/202/

01:750:203. GENERAL PHYSICS (3)

  • Course Description:
    Lec. 2 hrs., rec. 1 hr. Corequisites: 01:750:205-206 and any calculus course. Primarily for students in scientific curricula other than physics.

    Elementary but detailed analysis of fundamental topics; motion, gravitation, momentum, energy, electromagnetism, waves, heat, kinetic theory, quantum effects, atomic and nuclear structure.

    Physics 203-204 fulfills all the physics requirements for science majors, as well as admission to health profession schools and graduate schools. It provides an excellent opportunity for learning physics, the fundamental science, in a comprehensive, challenging and rewarding way. Graduates of this course have gone on to distinguished careers in medicine, science, law, public service etc... This course requires a good understanding of some math such as vectors, simple derivatives, trigonometry, algebra etc....

    This means: If you aren't fairly comfortable with math (especially algebra and trigonometry), this may require brushing up. You will in any case need to invest a lot of time doing problems, studying and getting help particularly if you haven't had any Physics in high school or college before.

  • Learning Management System: https://general.physics.rutgers.edu/fall/203/

01:750:204. GENERAL PHYSICS (3)

  • Course Description:
    Lec. 2 hrs., rec. 1 hr. Corequisites: 01:750:205-206 and any calculus course. Primarily for students in scientific curricula other than physics.

    Elementary but detailed analysis of fundamental topics; motion, gravitation, momentum, energy, electromagnetism, waves, heat, kinetic theory, quantum effects, atomic and nuclear structure.

    Physics 203-204 fulfills all the physics requirements for science majors, as well as admission to health profession schools and graduate schools. It provides an excellent opportunity for learning physics, the fundamental science, in a comprehensive, challenging and rewarding way. Graduates of this course have gone on to distinguished careers in medicine, science, law, public service etc... This course requires a good understanding of some math such as vectors, simple derivatives, trigonometry, algebra etc....

    This means: If you aren't fairly comfortable with math (especially algebra and trigonometry), this may require brushing up. You will in any case need to invest a lot of time doing problems, studying and getting help particularly if you haven't had any Physics in high school or college before.

  • Learning Management System: https://general.physics.rutgers.edu/spring/204/

01:750:205. GENERAL PHYSICS LABORATORY (1)

  • Course Description:
    Corequisites: 01:750:203-204.

    Laboratory to complement 01:750:203-204.

  • Learning Management System: https://sakai.rutgers.edu

01:750:206. GENERAL PHYSICS LABORATORY (1)

  • Course Description:
    Corequisites: 01:750:203-204.

    Laboratory to complement 01:750:203-204.

  • Learning Management System: https://sakai.rutgers.edu/

01:750:227. ANALYTICAL PHYSICS IIA (3)

  • Course Description:
    Prerequisites: Calc 2 01:640:152, 01:750:123-124 or 271. Students should also enroll in 01:750:229 lab. Primarily for engineering and physics majors.

    Electrostatics, particles in electric and magnetic fields, electromagnetism, circuits, Maxwell's equations, electromagnetic radiation.

    The course meets Tuesdays and Thursdays 1:55-2:50 PM in the Physics Lecture Hall, with one recitation session per week.

    The main goal of the course is to give students a solid grounding in electromagnetism at an elementary level, combining an understanding of the main principles and techniques, the ability to solve problems, and mastery of relevant mathematics appropriate to an honors level course. We will accomplish this through systematic study of the required textbook. Recitations will review the material in the previous two lectures, focusing on problem solving. Before each recitation, you will have 2-3 warm-up problems to prepare. At the end of each recitation, there will be a ten-minute quiz on the material discussed. Homeworks will be assigned weekly in WebAssign. There will be two hour exams and a closed-book final exam. Grades are computed using 20% for homework (lowest 2 dropped), 15% for recitation quizzes (lowest 2 dropped), 15% for the first hour exam, 20% for the second hour exam and 30% for the final exam. You will be able to access your grades for hw, quizzes and exams in the physics department gradebook (link coming).

  • Learning Management System: https://www.physics.rutgers.edu/ugrad/227

01:750:228. ANALYTICAL PHYSICS IIB (3)

  • Course Description:
    Prerequisite: 01:750:227 or 272 or 204. Students should also enroll in 01:750:230 lab. Primarily for engineering and physics majors.

    Waves and optics, relativity, quantum properties of electrons and photons, wave mechanics, atomic, solid state, nuclear and elementary particle physics.

  • Learning Management System: http://www.physics.rutgers.edu/ugrad/228/

01:750:229. ANALYTICAL PHYSICS II LABORATORY (1)

  • Course Description:
    Corequisites: 01:750:227 and 228.

    Laboratory to complement 01:750:227 and 228.

  • Learning Management System: https://sakai.rutgers.edu

01:750:230. ANALYTICAL PHYSICS II LABORATORY (1)

  • Course Description:
    Corequisites: 01:750:227 and 228.

    Laboratory to complement 01:750:227 and 228.

  • Learning Management System: https://sakai.rutgers.edu/

01:750:271. HONORS PHYSICS I (3)

  • Course Description:
    Prerequisite: Enrollment in an honors program or permission of the department.
    Corequisite: 01:640:CALC1 (for 271); 01:640:CALC2 (for 272).

    Introduction to classical physics, covering mechanics, fluids, thermodynamics, waves, electricity, magnetism, and optics.

  • Learning Management System: http://www.physics.rutgers.edu/ugrad/271/

01:750:272. HONORS PHYSICS II (3)

  • Course Description:
    Prerequisite: Enrollment in an honors program or permission of the department.
    Corequisite: 01:640:CALC1 (for 271); 01:640:CALC2 (for 272).

    Introduction to classical physics, covering mechanics, fluids, thermodynamics, waves, electricity, magnetism, and optics.

    The textbook: Electricity and Magnetism 3rd Edition, by Edward M. Purcell and David J. Morin
    Homework will be due in class on Wednesdays.
    When relevant, "warm-up" problems will be assigned and should be worked before recitation.

  • Learning Management System: http://www.physics.rutgers.edu/ugrad/272/

01:750:273. HONORS PHYSICS III (3)

  • Course Description:
    Prerequisite: 01:750:272 or permission of the department and 01:640:CALC2.

    Relativity, wave and quantum properties of photons and electrons, the structure of atoms, molecules, and solids; nuclear physics; elementary particles.

01:750:275. CLASSICAL PHYSICS LABORATORY (1)

  • Course Description:
    Prerequisite: Enrollment in an honors program or permission of the department.
    For physics majors and honors students.

    Experiments in classical physics.

01:750:276. CLASSICAL PHYSICS LABORATORY (1)

  • Course Description:
    Prerequisite: Enrollment in an honors program or permission of the department.
    For physics majors and honors students.

    Experiments in classical physics.

    • January 21-22: No labs
    • January 28-29: Interference of Sound
    • February 4-5: Ideal and Non-Ideal Gases
    • February 11-12: Electrostatics
    • February 18-19: Electric Potential and Field
    • February 26-27: Capacitance in RC Circuit
    • March 3-4: No labs
    • March 10-11: Electric and Magnetic Forces
    • March 17-18: Magnetic Force on Current
    • March 24-25: Spring Recess - No labs
    • March 31 - April 1: Ampere's Law
    • April 7-8: Geometrical Optics
    • April 14-15: Interference and Diffraction of Light
  • Learning Management System: https://sakai.rutgers.edu/x/AUauSC

01:750:301. PHYSICS OF SOUND (3)

  • Course Description:
    Prerequisites: Two terms of introductory physics and two terms of calculus.
    Primarily for science majors.

    The scientific basis of sound: waves, vibrating systems, normal modes, Fourier analysis and synthesis, perception and measurement of sound, noise, musical instruments, room acoustics, sound recording and reproduction, electronic synthesizers, and digital sound.

    Prerequisites: 01:750:204 OR 750:227 OR 750:272 OR 750:202 OR 750:194 OR 750:202
    Instructor: Prof. Valery Kiryukhin, Serin 118, 848-445-8752, email: vkir -AT- physics.rutgers.edu
    Office Hours: Wednesday 3 pm - 4 pm or by appointment
    Lectures: Monday and Wednesday 1:55 PM - 2:50PM, Physics Lecture Hall
    Labs: Wednesday (5:00 PM - 6:20 PM), Physics and Astronomy Building room 232
    Lab instructor: Seyed Sabok-Sayr, email: saboksayr -AT- physics.rutgers.edu
    Homework grader: Seyed Sabok-Sayr, email: saboksayr -AT- physics.rutgers.edu

  • Learning Management System: http://www.physics.rutgers.edu/ugrad/301/

01:750:305. MODERN OPTICS (3)

  • Course Description:
    Prerequisites: 01:750:227-228 or 272-273 or permission of instructor; 01:640:CALC3.

    Geometrical optics; electromagnetic waves, the wave equation; superposition, interference, diffraction, polarization, and coherence; holography; multilayer films, Fresnel equations; blackbody radiation, Einstein coefficients, lasers; waveguides and fiber optics; optical properties of materials.

    Understanding the fundamental principles of optics. Geometrical optics; electromagnetic waves, the wave equation; superposition, interference, diffraction, polarization, and coherence; holography; Fresnel equations; blackbody radiation, lasers; waveguides and fiber optics; optical properties of materials. 

  • Learning Management System: https://canvas.rutgers.edu/

01:750:313. MODERN PHYSICS (3)

  • Course Description:
    Prerequisites: 01:750:204 or 228; 01:640:CALC2.

    Relativistic mechanics, wave and quantum properties of photons and electrons, Schrodinger equation and its application to the structure of atoms, molecules, and solids; nuclear physics; elementary particles.

    This is a one-semester course providing an introduction to modern physics. We will spend roughly the first third of the course developing the two pillars of modern physics: the special theory of relativity and quantum mechanics. We will then discuss several of the main areas of current physics research: atomic physics, condensed matter physics, nuclear physics, elementary particle physics and cosmology. We obviously will not be able to cover these in detail in a one semester course. The course will primarily provide an introduction and overview. If you continue on in physics, you will see these topics in more depth in further undergraduate and graduate courses.

  • Learning Management System: https://www.physics.rutgers.edu/ugrad/313

01:750:323. ADVANCED GENERAL PHYSICS I (3)

  • Course Description:
    Prerequisites: 01:750:203-204 or permission of instructor; two terms of calculus.

    For students in the general physics and applied physics programs and others who wish a course in classical mechanics beyond the introductory level.

    This is the first of two one-semester courses on advanced general physics. The primary purpose of these courses is to give you an understanding of classical mechanics and classical electromagnetism at a greater depth than that covered in introductory physics. In Physics 323, we will focus on classical mechanics while Physics 324 in the spring will focus on electromagnetism. The format of the course will consist of both lectures and active learning recitation sessions.

  • Learning Management System: http://www.physics.rutgers.edu/ugrad/323/

01:750:324. ADVANCED GENERAL PHYSICS II (3)

  • Course Description:
    Prerequisites: 01:750:203-204 or permission of instructor; two terms of calculus.

    For students in the general physics and applied physics programs and others who wish a course in electromagnetism beyond the introductory level.

    This is the second of two one-semester courses on advanced general physics. The primary purpose of these courses is to give you an understanding of classical mechanics and classical electromagnetism at a greater depth than that covered in introductory physics. In Physics 324, we will focus on classical electrodynamics building on Physics 323 which focussed on classical mechanics. The format of the course will consist of both lectures and active learning sessions.

  • Learning Management System: http://www.physics.rutgers.edu/ugrad/324/

01:750:326. INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER-BASED EXPERIMENTATION AND PHYSICS COMPUTING (4)

  • Course Description:
    Prerequisites: 01:750:203-204, 205-206; or equivalent.

    Experiments in mechanics, electromagnetism, and modern physics, emphasizing error analysis. Uses the computer as a laboratory tool for symbolic manipulation, data collection, data analysis, simulation, and report writing.

  • Learning Management System: https://www.physics.rutgers.edu/ugrad/326

01:750:327. MODERN INSTRUMENTATION (3)

  • Course Description:
    Prerequisites: 01:750:203-204 and 205-206, or equivalent. Required for physics majors, but also suitable for psychology, biological sciences, and other physical science majors.

    Theory and use of integrated circuits and their interconnection to produce measuring devices, control apparatus, and interfaces for such devices to microcomputers.

    The goal of this class is to learn a number of basic electronic components and their analysis, so that you can understand and build circuits for use in physics experiments. You should normally perform laboratory experiments with a partner(s). You must share allphases of the experimental work, so all the partners understand the entire experiment. Each partner must participate actively in building the circuits, taking measurements and interpreting the data. Each student must keep his (her) own notes and prepare individual lab reports (no copying of reports from a partner is allowed!). The ideal lab reports have to be brief (3-5 pages), neat, and complete.

01:750:341. PRINCIPLES OF ASTROPHYSICS (3)

  • Course Description:
    Prerequisites: Two terms of introductory physics and two terms of calculus. 

    Properties and processes of the solar system, the stars, and the galaxies; origin of the elements; evolution of the stars and the universe; neutron stars and black holes.

  • Learning Management System: http://www.physics.rutgers.edu/ugrad/341/

01:750:342. PRINCIPLES OF ASTROPHYSICS (3)

  • Course Description:
    Prerequisites: Two terms of introductory physics and two terms of calculus. 

    Properties and processes of the solar system, the stars, and the galaxies; origin of the elements; evolution of the stars and the universe; neutron stars and black holes.

    Astrophysics is the application of physical principles to astronomical systems. In Physics 341 and 342 you will learn how to use gravity, electromagnetism, and atomic, nuclear, and gas physics to understand planets, stars, galaxies, dark matter, and the Universe as a whole. In Physics 342 we will focus on the question: How did we get here?

    Our story will include the nucleosynthesis of hydrogen and helium in the first few minutes after the Big Bang 13.7 billion years ago, the formation of stars from this primordial gas, and the forging of heavier elements, such as carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen, among all others within these stars' nuclear furnaces. Around at least one star in the Universe some of these heavy elements coagulated to form a rocky planet with a tenuous atmosphere. On this planet Earth, the energy from the star and the gas in the atmosphere were just right to allow the emergence of life. The energy that sustains us originated deep in the Sun, thanks to E=mc2 . The atoms that comprise our bodies were made inside dying stars. Literally, we are star dust. The goal of Physics 342 is to understand the physics of this remarkable story.

    Some astrophysical systems are described by equations that are fairly easy to solve, and we will certainly study them. However, many interesting systems cannot be solved exactly. Nevertheless, we can often use physical insight and approximate calculations to understand the salient features of a system without sweating the details. One goal of the course is to develop that skill. As you will see, it will take us very far (through the whole Universe, in fact!). Another goal is to learn about recent advances in astrophysics, a very dynamic field of research.

    Prerequisites for this class are two semesters of physics and two semesters of calculus. Previous study of modern physics is a must. I will briefly review physical principles as we need them, but assume that you have seen them before. I will also assume familiarity with vector calculus. Some of the assignments may involve a bit of computation that can be done with programs like Excel, Google Spreadsheets, Maple, Matlab, or Mathematica. Note that Physics 341 is not a prerequisite for Physics 342; the two courses are designed to be complementary, but independent.

    Lectures will be based on the course textbook, Principles of Astrophysics: Using Gravity and Stellar Physics to Explore the Cosmos, by Prof. Chuck Keeton. (It was written specifically for this course.)

  • Learning Management System: http://www.physics.rutgers.edu/ugrad/342/

01:750:345. COMPUTATIONAL ASTROPHYSICS (3)

  • Course Description:
    Lec. 1.5 hrs., lab. 1.5 hrs. Prerequisites: 01:750:341,342 or special permission of instructor.  

    Introduction to computational astrophysics, including key algorithms, their implementation in code, and their application to current research in astrophysics.  Extended projects feature analysis of real data and simulations.

     

  • Learning Management System: http://www.physics.rutgers.edu/ugrad/345/

01:750:346. OBSERVATIONAL ASTRONOMY (3)

  • Course Description:
    Lec. 1.5 hrs., lab. 1.5 hrs. Prerequisites: 01:750:341,342,345 (or significant prior experience programming in Python, C++, or a similar language) or special permission of the instructor.

     Introduction to the tools and techniques of observational astronomy across the electromagnetic spectrum and to their application in the context of current research in astrophysics. Extended projects offer each student an opportunity to work with astronomical data from at least two wavelength regimes (among radio, optical/infrared, and X-ray), and in the two core modes of astronomical observations (imaging and spectroscopy).

  • Learning Management System: http://www.physics.rutgers.edu/ugrad/346/

01:750:351. THERMAL PHYSICS (3)

  • Course Description:
    Prerequisites: 01:750:227 or 272 or permission of the instructor; 01:640:CALC3.

    Principles of thermodynamics with physical and chemical applications: energy, entropy, and temperature, the three laws of thermodynamics, cycles, open systems, critical phenomena, chemical equilibrium, ideal gas reactions, phase rule, phase diagrams, kinetic theory, introduction to statistical mechanics.

  • Learning Management System: http://www.physics.rutgers.edu/ugrad/351/

01:750:361. QUANTUM MECHANICS AND ATOMIC PHYSICS (3)

  • Course Description:
    Prerequisites: 01:640:CALC4; 01:750:228 or 273 or permission of instructor.

    Introductory quantum mechanics: matter waves, uncertainty principle, stationary states and operators; the Schrodinger equation and its solutions for simple potentials; the hydrogen atom, quantization of angular momentum, spin; complex atoms and molecules.

  • Learning Management System: http://www.physics.rutgers.edu/ugrad/361/

01:750:368. JUNIOR SEMINAR (1)

  • Course Description:
    For physics majors only.

    Development of communication skills needed by professionals in physics and related fields. Oral and written reports, discussions of topics of current interest, and career options.

01:750:381. MECHANICS (3)

  • Course Description:
    Prerequisites: 01:750:124 or 203 or 271; Corequisite: 01:640:CALC3 or permission of instructor. A theoretical course, primarily for physics majors.

    Intermediate treatment of Newtonian mechanics, including particle dynamics, rigid body motion, accelerated and rotating reference frames, Lagrange's and Hamilton's equations.

  • Learning Management System: http://www.physics.rutgers.edu/ugrad/381/

01:750:382. MECHANICS (3)

  • Course Description:
    Prerequisites: 01:750:124 or 203 or 271; Corequisite: 01:640:CALC3 or permission of instructor. A theoretical course, primarily for physics majors.

    Intermediate treatment of Newtonian mechanics, including particle dynamics, rigid body motion, accelerated and rotating reference frames, Lagrange's and Hamilton's equations.

  • Learning Management System: http://www.physics.rutgers.edu/ugrad/382/

01:750:385. ELECTROMAGNETISM (3)

  • Course Description:
    Prerequisites: 01:750:227 or 272 or 324 or permission of instructor; 01:640:CALC3.

    An intermediate course for physics majors and others who wish a thorough discussion of the fundamental laws of electromagnetism; electric and magnetic fields, dielectric and magnetic materials, D.C. and A.C. circuits, Maxwell's equations, electromagnetic radiation.

01:750:386. ELECTROMAGNETISM (3,3)

  • Course Description:
    Prerequisites: 01:750:227 or 272 or 324 or permission of instructor; 01:640:CALC3.

    An intermediate course for physics majors and others who wish a thorough discussion of the fundamental laws of electromagnetism; electric and magnetic fields, dielectric and magnetic materials, D.C. and A.C. circuits, Maxwell's equations, electromagnetic radiation.

01:750:387. EXPERIMENTAL MODERN PHYSICS (3)

  • Course Description:
    Prerequisites: 01:750:326, 327; corequisite: 361 or 313 or permission of instructor. Credit not given for both 01:750:387 and 389.

    Experiments in atomic, nuclear, condensed matter, and surface physics.

    The purpose of this course is to acquire hands-on experience with experimental aspects of modern physics and to deepen your understanding of the relations between experiment and theory. You will carry out experiments which, when first performed, led to seminal discoveries in physics. In the process you will acquire a set of basic skills essential to becoming an experimental scientist. You will learn to use advanced laboratory equipment and will acquire computational skills necesasry for data analysis and error estimation. In adition you will acquire the skills to produce credible records of scientific data and you will learn how to disseminate scientific findings through written reports and oral presentations.

  • Learning Management System: http://www.physics.rutgers.edu/ugrad/389/

01:750:388. EXPERIMENTAL MODERN PHYSICS (3)

  • Course Description:
    Prerequisites: 01:750:326, 327; corequisite: 361 or 313 or permission of instructor. Credit not given for both 01:750:387 and 389.

    Experiments in atomic, nuclear, condensed matter, and surface physics.

    The purpose of this course is to acquire hands-on experience with experimental aspects of modern physics and to deepen your understanding of the relations between experiment and theory. You will carry out experiments which, when first performed, led to seminal discoveries in physics. In the process you will acquire a set of basic skills essential to becoming an experimental scientist. You will learn to use advanced laboratory equipment and will acquire computational skills necesasry for data analysis and error estimation. In adition you will acquire the skills to produce credible records of scientific data and you will learn how to disseminate scientific findings through written reports and oral presentations.

  • Learning Management System: http://www.physics.rutgers.edu/ugrad/389/

01:750:389. EXPERIMENTAL APPLIED PHYSICS (3)

  • Course Description:
    Prerequisites: 01:750:326, 327; corequisite: 361 or 313 or permission of instructor. Credit not given for both 01:750:387 and 389.

    Experiments in classical and modern physics emphasizing techniques useful for applications.

01:750:397. PHYSICS OF MODERN DEVICES (3)

  • Course Description:
    Prerequisites: Two terms of introductory physics and a course in calculus.

    Physical laws and principles underlying modern devices and processes; examples including motors, generators, refrigerators, vacuum tubes, transistors, radio and television receivers, computers, rockets, nuclear reactors, radiation detectors, lasers, and holograms.

    The goal of this course is to bring the textbook physics out to the technologically-rich modern world around us.

    Physics is the process of simplifying the phenomena around us, trying to figure out how they work. Although this approach helps understand the fundamental principles of the nature, there usually is a big gap between what we learn from the standard physics courses and what we encounter every day.  If you look around us, you can find so many magical devices that are directly affecting our everyday life: cell phones, radios, TVs, generators, light emitting diodes, fluorescent lights, (digital) clocks, GPS, microwave ovens, refrigerators, airconditioners, touch screens, computers, hard disks, memory devices, batteries, solar cells, printers, cameras, ... 

    Although most of these devices rely on simple physical principles that average physics undergrads are familiar with, the connection between those fundamental principles and the actual functionalities is rarely obvious. In this course, we will go over how these devices work at the level average physics undergrads can understand.  

    As we uncover the underlying mechanisms of one device after another, you will be amazed to find out how a few simple principles combine to exhibit such magical functionalities in all these devices.

    It is not a sheer coincidence that Albert Einstein has come up with some of the greatest scientific ideas while he was working as a patent officer figuring out how all the intriguing devices filed for patents should or should not work.

  • Learning Management System: https://sites.google.com/site/moderndevices397/home

01:750:406. INTRODUCTORY SOLID STATE PHYSICS (3)

  • Course Description:
    Prerequisites: 01:750:361 and 386, or permission of instructor.

    The fundamental properties of metals, insulators and semiconductors; dielectrics, magnetism, superconductivity.

    This course is intended to provide an introduction to the physics of solids from an experimentalist's perspective (qualitative approach will often prevail over a quantitative one). The topics covered are listed in the syllabus. They include the static and dynamic properties of crystal lattices, the band theory of solids, electron transport in electric and magnetic fields, and superconductivity as an example of quantum collective phenomena. A few applications will be considered (from the field effect transistors to superconducting qubits).

  • Learning Management System: http://www.physics.rutgers.edu/ugrad/406/

01:750:417. INTERMEDIATE QUANTUM MECHANICS (3)

  • Course Description:
    Prerequisite: 01:750:361.

    Vector space formulation, operators, eigenfunctions, bound states, angular momentum, central potentials, approximation methods, scattering.

    Syllabus consists of all topics from the text except the ones marked below as being "not covered"

  • Learning Management System: http://www.physics.rutgers.edu/~somalwar/417/2020/index.html

01:750:418. NUCLEI AND PARTICLES (3)

  • Course Description:
    Prerequisite: 01:750:361.

    Nuclear forces and models; classification and interactions of elementary particles.

    Syllabus consists of all topics from the text except the ones marked below as being "not covered"

  • Learning Management System: http://www.physics.rutgers.edu/~somalwar/418/2019/index.html

01:750:421. An Introduction to Quantum Computing (3)

  • Course Description:
    Prerequisites: An intoductory calculus-level course on modern physics (01:750:228 or 01:750:273) and a course that covers linear algebra (01:640:224 or 01:640:250).

    This is a three-credit course that provides an introduction to quantum computing from a physics perspective.  Although the course is primarily intended for physics majors, computer science and math majors should also find the course to be of interest.  The course will include a discussion of the basic principles of quantum mechanics and concepts of quantum information.  Issues related to entanglement and quantum measurement will be discussed followed by discussions of various quantum algorithms.  The course will conclude with a look at qubit technologies and some of the recent developments involving information in the field of quantum gravity. 

  • Learning Management System: http://www.physics.rutgers.edu/ugrad/421/

01:750:431. INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY FOR PHYSICISTS (3)

  • Course Description:
    Prerequisite: Proficiency in Calculus and Linear Algebra.

    Bayesian analysis, The Central Limit theorem, Parametric and Non Parametric Tests of Significance, Sequence Alignment, Phylogenetic Analysis, Clustering and Pattern Recognition Techniques, Monte Carlo Simulations, Neural Networks and Evolutionary Game Theory.

    In the twentieth century, physicists such as Leo Szilard, Erwin Schrodinger, Francis Crick, Walter Gilbert and Venki Ramakrishnan played a major role in developing some of the key ideas in biology. The sequencing of the human genome and the big-data genomic revolution it has unleashed have created new and exciting opportunities for physicists to make further discoveries in biology. This course is intended for junior and senior physics majors who are interested in working in the exciting area of biophysics and computational biology. The goal is to introduce the students to the ideas and methods needed to solve exciting problems in the genomic age.

  • Learning Management System: http://www.physics.rutgers.edu/ugrad/431/

01:750:441. STARS AND STAR FORMATION (3)

  • Course Description:
    Prerequisites: 01:750:342 or (351 and 361). 

    Observed properties of stars. Internal structure of stars, energy generation and transport, neutrinos, solar oscillations. Evolution of isolated and double stars, red giants, white dwarfs, variable stars, supernovae. Challenges presented by formation of stars, importance of magnetic fields. Pre-main sequence stellar evolution.

    We will study the observed properties and physics of stars, including their internal structure, energy generation and transport, and their atmospheres. We will examine star formation, stellar evolution, and stellar remnants, including white dwarfs, neutron stars, and black holes.

  • Learning Management System: http://www.physics.rutgers.edu/ugrad/441/

01:750:442. HIGH ENERGY ASTROPHYSICS AND RADIATIVE PROCESSES (3)

  • Course Description:
    Prerequisites: 01:750:342 or (361 and 385-386). 

    Radiation and scattering processes in plasma. Detection and X- and gamma-rays. Supernovae and remnants, pulsars. Gamma-ray bursts. Accretion disks and binary star outbursts. Quasars and active galactic nuclei. Cosmic rays.

    Course Supervisor: Jack Hughes, Serin 307W, 848-445-8878, jph "at" physics.rutgers.edu
    Office Hour: TBD (or send an e-mail to schedule a different meeting time)
    Lectures: TF (10:20 - 11:40 AM), ARC-207

  • Learning Management System: http://sakai.rutgers.edu/

01:750:443. GALAXIES AND THE MILKY WAY (3)

  • Course Description:
    Prerequisites: 01:750:342 or (351 and 361 and 381). 

    Properties of galaxies: photometry, kinematics and masses. Disk galaxies: spiral patterns, bars and warps, gas content, star formation rates, chemical evolution. Elliptical galaxies: shapes. Structure of the Milky Way. Nature of dark matter.

    Galaxies are an important nexus in the cosmic hierarchy: they serve as lighthouses marking out the vast cosmic structures that can span many millions of parsecs, but are fascinating in themselves as laboratories for the "small scale" processes of stellar birth and evolution. We now have images of billions of galaxies, and can observe them from a time less than a billion years after the Big Bang until the present day. We can study not only the appearance or "morphology" of galaxies, but also in some cases measure properties of their stellar populations, their quota of heavy elements, their gas content, and the internal motions (or kinematics) of their stars and gas. Although galaxies exhibit amazing diversity, they also conform to certain surprisingly tight correlations. From kinematic measurements, we can infer that galaxies contain a major unseen component that influences the motions of their stars and gas: the mysterious "dark matter". Moreover, the stars and gas that we can measure within galaxies falls far short of what we would expect for the cosmic "baryon budget". The study of modern galaxy formation focuses on trying to understand the observed demographics and correlations of galaxy properties and how these evolve over cosmic time, in the context of the "hierarchical structure formation" picture provided by the Cold Dark Matter theory.

    In this course, we will warm up with a brief review of stars and radiative processes and basic cosmology. We will start our study of galaxies with our home Galaxy, the Milky Way, our sister galaxy M31 (Andromeda), and our smaller companions the Local Group dwarfs. Even this relatively small population of galaxies in our own "backyard" poses a number of unsolved puzzles. We will then cover the properties of spiral, lenticular, and elliptical galaxies in the 'nearby' Universe, and discuss the larger structures that form galaxy habitats: groups and clusters. One fascinating open question is whether galaxy properties are mainly shaped by "internal" processes or by their environment. We will discuss the evidence that many or even most galaxies harbor supermassive black holes in their nuclei. We will wind up the course with a discussion of how we can find and observe extremely distant (high redshift) galaxies, and of how galaxies were different in the past.

  • Learning Management System: http://www.physics.rutgers.edu/ugrad/443/

01:750:444. INTRODUCTION TO COSMOLOGY (3)

  • Course Description:
    Prerequisites: 01:750:(341 and 342) or (351 and 361). 

    Expansion of the universe, techniques for distance estimation. Large-scale structure of universe. Cosmological models: open, closed, flat and accelerating universes. Microwave background: observations, properties and origin. Problems of standard cosmology and preliminary concept of inflation.

01:750:451. PHYSICAL OCEANOGRAPHY (3)

  • Course Description:
    Two 80-min. lecs., one 55-min. rec. Credit not given for both this course and 11:628:451 or 16:712:501. Prerequisite: 01:750:204.

    Principles of ocean physics. Mass, momentum, heat, and freshwater conservation and atmospheric exchange. Influence of Earth's rotation. The ocean's role in climate. Tides, waves, and currents. Effects of ocean circulation on its biology and chemistry.

    This course is designed to introduce students to the important physical processes in the oceans in such a way that they will understand both the conceptual physical principles and at the larger scale how these fit into the earth as a system.  The initial focus is to develop the basic equations which describe the principles upon which physical oceanography is based.  These principles are then used to help understand waves, tides, currents, and the large-scale ocean circulation.  Homework problems are assigned to reinforce the concepts learned in class.  Throughout the course, examples will be given to show how physical oceanography affects and is affected by the biological, chemical, and geological processes in the ocean.

  • Learning Management System: https://marine.rutgers.edu/dmcs/ms501/

01:750:464. MATHEMATICAL PHYSICS (3)

  • Course Description:
    Prerequisites: 01:640:423 or equivalent.

    Physical applications of linear algebra, the exterior calculus, differential forms, complexes and cohomology. Applications will include Hamiltonian dynamics, normal mode analysis, Markov processes, thermodynamics, Schroedinger's equation, special relativity, electrostatics, magnetostatics, Maxwell's equations, and wave equations.

    For any issue you wish to take up with me that does not require a face to face conversation email is the most efficient way to get a quick response: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

    Tel: 848-445-8966

  • Learning Management System: http://www.physics.rutgers.edu/ugrad/464/

01:750:487. SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHYSICS (3)

  • Course Description:
    Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

    Study of selected areas in physics.

    This is a three-credit course that will provide an introduction to the theoretical and experimental aspects of quantum computing from a physics perspective. Although the course is primarily intended for physics majors, computer science and math majors might also find the course to be of interest. Although there is an overlap with the material covered in the one-credit course, Physics 489, from last spring, students who took 489 but who would like to see a more extensive and in-depth treatment of the material are welcome and encouraged to take this course. In this course, we will go into the material in more depth.

    We will first review the basic principles of quantum mechanics and then discuss the general underlying concepts of quantum computation. We will then look at qubit technologies for implementing quantum computers. We'll discuss an overview of the various technologies and then focus on superconducting qubits, one of the most promising technologies and the one that is being pursued by IBM, Google and others. We'll then discuss the potentially error-free technology of topological qubits that has been the focus of Microsoft's quantum computing efforts. We will conclude the course with a brief look at some of the exciting developments involving quantum information in the field of quantum gravity and in the field of tensor networks of many-body systems of entangled particles.

  • Learning Management System: http://www.physics.rutgers.edu/ugrad/464/http://www.physics.rutgers.edu/ugrad/488/

01:750:488. SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHYSICS (3)

  • Course Description:
    Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

    Study of selected areas in physics.

    This is a three-credit course that will provide an introduction to the theoretical and experimental aspects of quantum computing from a physics perspective. Although the course is primarily intended for physics majors, computer science and math majors might also find the course to be of interest. Although there is an overlap with the material covered in the one-credit course, Physics 489, from last spring, students who took 489 but who would like to see a more extensive and in-depth treatment of the material are welcome and encouraged to take this course. In this course, we will go into the material in more depth.

    We will first review the basic principles of quantum mechanics and then discuss the general underlying concepts of quantum computation. We will then look at qubit technologies for implementing quantum computers. We'll discuss an overview of the various technologies and then focus on superconducting qubits, one of the most promising technologies and the one that is being pursued by IBM, Google and others. We'll then discuss the potentially error-free technology of topological qubits that has been the focus of Microsoft's quantum computing efforts. We will conclude the course with a brief look at some of the exciting developments involving quantum information in the field of quantum gravity and in the field of tensor networks of many-body systems of entangled particles.

  • Learning Management System: http://www.physics.rutgers.edu/ugrad/464/http://www.physics.rutgers.edu/ugrad/488/

01:750:491. RESEARCH IN PHYSICS (BA)

  • Course Description:
    Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

    Independent research supervised by a member of the department.

01:750:492. RESEARCH IN PHYSICS (BA)

  • Course Description:
    Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

    Independent research supervised by a member of the department.

01:750:493. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN PHYSICS (1-4)

  • Course Description:
    Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

    Independent study supervised by a member of the department.

01:750:494. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN PHYSICS (1-4)

  • Course Description:
    Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

    Independent study supervised by a member of the department.

01:750:495. HONORS IN PHYSICS (1-4)

  • Course Description:
    Prerequisite: Invitation of chairperson.

    Supervised independent research or reading in experimental or theoretical physics culminating in a seminar conducted by the student.

01:750:496. HONORS IN PHYSICS (1-4)

  • Course Description:
    Prerequisite: Invitation of chairperson.

    Supervised independent research or reading in experimental or theoretical physics culminating in a seminar conducted by the student.

01:750:497. HONORS IN ASTRONOMY (1-4)

  • Course Description:
    Prerequisite: Invitation of chairperson. 

    Supervised independent research or reading in astronomy, culminating in a seminar conducted by the student.

01:750:498. HONORS IN ASTRONOMY (1-4)

  • Course Description:
    Prerequisite: Invitation of chairperson. 

    Supervised independent research or reading in astronomy, culminating in a seminar conducted by the student.

Sours: https://physics.rutgers.edu/academics/undergraduate-program/course-synopses
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Special Permission Number / Pre-requisite Override

Fall 2021 requests:

Please go to the following link if you are applying for a special permission number for any undergraduate course. System will be open to SPNs for juniors and seniors on May 17, and to sophomores on June 4.

https://secure.sas.rutgers.edu/apps/special_permission/physics/

This site distributes Special Permission Numbers (SPN) to students seeking enrollment in the Fall (2021) semester offering of Online General Physics 203, Section 90:

https://egp.rutgers.edu/cgi/PhysSPN.pl

SPN's will be accepted in three rounds. Round 1 will open May 17 at 12:01 am. It will be open only to students in the classes of 2022, and 2023 with more than 90 credits, and close on June 4 at 5 pm. All notifications will go out at that time.

Round 2 will open June 5 at 5 pm and close August 13 at 5 pm. It will be open to all classes for students with more than 60 credits. Notifications will go out after review.

Round 3 will open August 14 at 5 pm and close September 10 at 5 pm, and will be open to all students. Notifications will go out after review.

For SPN's for the on-line sections of General Physics, please request here:
https://egp.rutgers.edu/cgi/PhysSPN.pl

If you need an SPN for an honors course, or pre-requisite override, please email directly to Professor Jolie Cizewski at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. with the subject as "SPN-HONORS" or "PRE-REQ", exactly as that. In the body, please give your name, RUID (the 9 digit number), and details of your request, including the index numbers of your 3 preferred sections, if appropriate.

Contact Information

For questions about physics/astrophysics major programs, advice on course selections, and evaluations of courses taken at other universities, send email to the Undergraduate Program Director This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Sours: https://physics.rutgers.edu/academics/undergraduate-program/special-permission-number-pre-requisite-override
Dr. Noemie Koller - Rutgers Physics Professor

Courses taught once every academic year

50:750:131 Elements of Physics I (R) (3)
Corequisites: 50:640:121 Calculus 1 -AND- 50:750:133 Lab 1. Offered every Fall and Summer.
Intended for physics majors and engineering students, but open to other qualified students. A calculus-based introduction to classical physics: mechanics, heat, wave motion, sound, electricity, and light.

50:750:132 Elements of Physics II (R) (3)
Corequisites: 50:640:122 Calculus 2 -AND- 50:750:134 Lab 2. Offered every Spring and Summer.
Intended for physics majors and engineering students, but open to other qualified students. A calculus-based introduction to classical physics: mechanics, heat, wave motion, sound, electricity, and light.

50:750:133 Introductory Physics Laboratory I (R) (1)
Corequisites: 50:750:131 -OR- 50:750:203. Offered every Fall and Summer.
The laboratory illustrates phenomena and concepts studied in 50:750:131 -OR- 50:750:203.

50:750:134 Introductory Physics Laboratory II (R) (1)
Corequisites: 50:750:132 -OR- 50:750:204. Offered every Spring and Summer.
The laboratory illustrates phenomena and concepts studied in 50:750:132 -OR- 50:750:204.

50:750:140 Introduction to Scientific Programming (R) (3)
Offered every Spring. Students will gain an introduction to scientific programming and numerical methods utilizing a scripting environment such as MATLAB. Particular emphasis will be placed on solving relevant problems in biology, physics, and engineering. No prior exposure to computer programming will be assumed.

50:750:203 General Physics I (R) (3)
Prerequisite: 50:640:115 Pre-Calculus; Corequisites: 50:750:133 Lab 1; Offered every Fall and Summer.
For biology, chemistry, premedicine, predentistry, and preveterinary medicine students, but may be taken by others. An introduction to mechanics, heat, wave motion, sound, light, electricity and magnetism, and selected topics from modern physics.

50:750:204 General Physics II (R) (3)
Prerequisite: 50:640:115 Pre-Calculus; Corequisites: 50:750:134 Lab 2; Offered every Spring and Summer.
For biology, chemistry, premedicine, predentistry, and preveterinary medicine students, but may be taken by others. An introduction to mechanics, heat, wave motion, sound, light, electricity and magnetism, and selected topics from modern physics.

50:750:232 Elements of Modern Physics (3)
Prerequisite: 50:750:132 Elements of Physics 2; Corequisite: 50:640:221 Calculus 3 -AND- 50:750:238 the Lab; Offered every Fall.
Topics from special relativity, quantum theory, atomic physics, molecules, statistical physics, solid-state physics, nuclear physics and elementary particles.

50:750:238 Modern Physics Laboratory (1)
Corequisite: 50:750:232 Modern Physics. Offered every Fall. 
Students will perform experiments of great historical significance that helped to reshape our understanding of Physics during the late 19th and early 20th century. Examples include the Millikan Oil-Drop and Frank-Hertz experiments.

50:750:233 Electric Circuits I (3)
Prerequisites: 50:640:121 Calculus 1; Corequisites: 50:750:235 the Lab; Offered every Fall. 
DC and steady-state AC circuit analysis, network theorems, matrix methods, two ports, controlled sources, nonlinear elements, transients, step and impulse response, and computer methods. Equivalent to Principles of Electrical Engineering I (14:332:221).

50:750:235 Electric Circuits Laboratory I (1)
Corequisites: 50:750:233. Offered every Fall.
Laboratory exercises to accompany and illustrate 50:750:233. Equivalent to Principles of Electrical Engineering I Laboratory (14:332:223).

50:750:253 Mechanics I (3)
Prerequisites: 50:640:122 Calculus 2 -AND- Elements of Physics 1. Offered every Spring. 
Equilibrium of planar and spatial systems, analysis of structures, friction, centroids and moments of inertia, virtual work, dynamics of particles, and rigid bodies. Equivalent to Engineering Mechanics: Statics (14:440:221).

50:750:322 3D Printing (3)(fulfills the Gen Ed PLS requirement)
No Prerequisites; Offered every other Spring.
This course will provide students with a working knowledge and understanding of 3D printing. Several aspects of the revolutionary technology will be examined spanning a wide spectrum of topics including: additive manufacturing, Computer Aided Design software, phase changes in thermoplastics, social impact of the technology. In addition to exposing students to the underlying science of the technology, students will gain experience in both designing items suitable for printing and seeing through to its successful fabrication.

50:750:489 Independent Studies
Prerequisites: Senior status and permission of instructor.

50:750:490 Independent Studies
Prerequisites: Senior status and permission of instructor.

50:750:491 Research in Physics I (3) (W)(fulfills the Gen Ed PLS requirement)
In consultation with a faculty advisor, students will develop and carry out an independent research project. The students will be required to present a seminar to the department and to produce a written paper that is suitable for publication in an undergraduate research journal. Students will also be strongly encouraged to present a poster at an undergraduate research conference or the equivalent. Open to Physics students in their junior or senior year. Meets the general education “writing intensive” requirement.

50:750:492 Research in Physics II (3) (W)(fulfills the Gen Ed PLS requirement)
In consultation with a faculty advisor, students will develop and carry out an independent research project. The students will be required to present a seminar to the department and to produce a written paper that is suitable for publication in an undergraduate research journal. Students will also be strongly encouraged to present a poster at an undergraduate research conference or the equivalent. Open to Physics students in their junior or senior year. Meets the general education “writing intensive” requirement.

 

Courses taught every other academic year

50:750:301 Electromagnetic Theory (3)
Prerequisites: 50:750:232 Modern Physics -AND- 50:640:314 Differential Equations. Offered every other Fall.
Electrostatic field, dielectrics, steady currents, magnetic fields and materials, and electromagnetic induction.

50:750:302 Electromagnetic Waves and Optics (3)
Prerequisite: 50:750:301 the Theory. Offered every other Spring.
Maxwell’s equations, electromagnetic waves, radiation, guided waves, dispersion, reflection, refraction, interference, polarization, and optics of solids.

50:750:307 Electronics (3)
Prerequisite: 50:750:204 -OR- 50:750:132 -OR- permission of instructor. Offered every other Fall.
This course is designed to give a hands-on introduction to electronics for all interested students. Topic covered include AC and DC circuit analysis, signal characteristics and acquisition, transistors, feedback, operational amplifiers, power supplies, noise, digital circuits, instrumentation, computer interfacing, and optimization of measurements. Emphasis will be placed upon the development of practical knowledge and skills. One lab and one course meeting per week.

50:750:309 Analytical Mechanics I (3) 
Prerequisites: 50:750:132 Elements of Physics 2 -AND- 50:640:314 Differential Equations. Offered every other Fall.
Particle dynamics, simple harmonic motion, central forces, statics and dynamics of rigid bodies, waves, and Lagrange’s and Hamilton’s equations.

50:750:310 Analytical Mechanics II (3) 
Prerequisites: 50:750:132 Elements of Physics 2 -AND- 50:640:314 Differential Equations. Offered every other Spring.
Continuation of 50:750:309. Particle dynamics, simple harmonic motion, central forces, statics and dynamics of rigid bodies, waves, and Lagrange’s and Hamilton’s equations.

50:750:321 Physics of Music (3)
No Prerequisites; Offered every other Fall.
This course is designed to explore the physics behind music in a manner accessible to students from all backgrounds. It will cover the fundamentals of the production, propogation, and reception of sound. Topics covered will include: waveforms, modulation, intensity and the decibel scale, wave packets, beats, reflection, refraction, interference, the Doppler shift, simple harmonic oscillator, work, energy, resonance. It will cover the production of sound by strings, percussions, blown pipes, and blown reeds. Finally, the fundamentals of room acoustics will be investigated.

50:750:351 Thermal Physics I (3)
Prerequisites: 50:750:132 Elements of Physics 2 -AND- 50:640:221 Calculus 3. Offered every other Fall.
Temperature-dependent properties of gases, liquids, and solids, such as specific heat, vapor pressure, dielectric constant, internal energy, entropy, compressibility, and conductivity. Presents classical thermodynamics, which derives relations between various quantities, and statistical methods used to derive classical thermodynamics from the atomic point of view. Presents Brownian motion, random walks, and fluctuation. Gives applications of the second law to the production and uses of energy.

50:750:362 Biophysics (3)
Prerequisites: 50:750:132 Elements of Physics 2; Often cross-listed with 56:121:565. Offered every other Spring.
An introductory biophysics course for undergraduate or graduate students with at least two semesters of undergraduate physics, intended for students trained in either the physical or life sciences. Themes will include both novel physical insights gained from study of biological systems as well as the power of physical descriptions for advancing biological understanding. The course will explore random and diffusive phenomena in cellular processes, the effect of frictional forces on molecular motion in the low Reynolds number environment of the cell, and the role of entropy and free energy in driving reactions and assembly. Students will learn the importance of elastic descriptions for understanding the biological function of fibrous proteins, membranes, and DNA. Fundamental properties of cellular circuits, including ion channels and nerve impulses, will be presented.

50:750:406 Condensed Matter and Material Physics (3)
Prerequisites: 50:750:232 Modern Physics -AND- 50:640:314 Differential Equations. Offered every other Spring.
This course is an introductory approach to condensed matter and materials physics. The fundamentals of electronic theory will be introduced and utilized to relate the optical, electrical and magnetic properties of materials. Topics will include, but not be limited to, semiconductor band structure, atomic binding energies, crystalline structures and ferroic-type ordering. Additionally, select topics from soft condensed matter physics such as the physics of polymers and electro-optical properties of liquid crystals will be covered.

50:750:413 Elements of Quantum Mechanics I (3)
Prerequisites: 50:750:232 Modern Physics -AND- 50:640:314 Differential Equations. Offered every other Fall.
Probability waves, Schrodinger and Klein-Gordon equations, eigenvalues, eigenfunctions, wave packets, unitary and hermitian operators, matrix elements, commutation relations, perturbation theory, radiative transitions, and scattering theory.

50:750:420 Methods of Material Characterization (3)
Lec. 1 hr., lab. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Offered every other Spring.
The fundamentals of materials characterization will be introduced including optical, surface, and structural techniques. Methods will include Uv-Vis, Infrared, and Raman spectroscopy, atomic force, optical and electronic microscopies, X-ray diffraction and photoluminescence measurements.

50:750:430 Optical Microscopy (3)
No Prerequisites; Offered every other Spring.
Optical microscopy is an invaluable tool in a broad range of scientific research ranging from geology to pharmacology, however, its foundations are planted in physics. This course is designed to provide students with a comprehensive survey of optical microscopy techniques through a series of lectures and hands-on demonstrations. Students will begin by learning the fundamentals of optical image formation and microscope design, and this foundation will be built upon with particulars that characterize specific techniques. Optical microscopy techniques that will be covered include brightfield, darkfield, and phase-contrast microscopy, fluorescence microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy, multiphoton laser scanning microscopy, as well as super-resolution techniques.

50:750:463 Mathematical Physics I (3)
Prerequisites: 50:750:232 Modern Physics -AND- 50:640:314 Differential Equations; Often cross-listed with 56:121:563 Mathematical Methods; Offered every other Spring.
Mathematical techniques used in advanced work in the physical sciences. Covers determinants, matrices, ordinary and partial differential equations, boundary and eigenvalue problems. Fourier-series and integrals, transform theory, orthogonal functions, complex variables. Extensive problem work.

 

Courses taught only with sufficient interest from students and faculty

50:750:103 Is the Universe Elegant? (R) (3)
No prerequisite. Designed for nonscience majors.
This course is designed to explore the frontier areas of Physics (particle physics, astrophysics, and cosmology) in a manner accessible to students from all backgrounds and stresses the development of conceptual understanding before computational literacy. Limitations of scientific knowledge and the insufficiency of science to answer questions of origin and value will be discussed as well.

50:750:171 Topics in Physics I (2)
The subject matter changes depending on the interests of the instructor and the students. Sample topics: the energy crisis and sources of energy or the physics of the atmosphere and weather forecasting.

50:750:172 Topics in Physics II (2)
The subject matter changes depending on the interests of the instructor and the students. Sample topics: the energy crisis and sources of energy or the physics of the atmosphere and weather forecasting.

50:750:223 Conceptual Physics for the Health Sciences (4)
Prerequisite: 50:640:115 Pre-Calculus.
Designed specifically for Health Sciences majors. A one semester introductory physics course that covers Newtonian mechanics, waves, electromagnetism, optics, and selected topics from modern physics. Includes one laboratory session per week.

50:750:234 Electric Circuits II (3)
Prerequisites: 50:640:122 Calculus 2; Corequisites: 50:750:236 the Lab. 
DC and steady-state AC circuit analysis, network theorems, matrix methods, two ports, controlled sources, nonlinear elements, transients, step and impulse response, and computer methods. Equivalent to Principles of Electrical Engineering II (14:332:222).

50:750:236 Electric Circuits Laboratory II (1)
Corequisites: 50:750:234. 
Laboratory exercises to accompany and illustrate 50:750:234. Equivalent to Principles of Electrical Engineering II Laboratory (14:332:224).

50:750:254 Mechanics II (3)
Prerequisites: 50:750:131 Elements of Physics 1 -AND- 50:640:122 Calculus 2. 
Equilibrium of planar and spatial systems, analysis of structures, friction, centroids and moments of inertia, virtual work, dynamics of particles, and rigid bodies. Equivalent to Engineering Mechanics: Dynamics (14:440:222).

50:750:291 Mechanics of Materials (3)
Prerequisite: 50:750:253 Mechanics 1. 
Stress and strain in elastic solids such as shafts and beams. Combined stresses; statically indeterminate beams. Equivalent to Mechanics of Solids (14:650:291).

50:750:304 Introduction to Astrophysics (3)
Prerequisites: 50:640:122 Calculus 2 -AND- 50:100:306 Descriptive Astronomy.
Presents, at a calculus-based level, a survey of such topics from current astronomy as planetary atmospheres, the greenhouse effect, solar wind and its interaction with the earth’s magnetic field, Van Allen radiation belts, some aspects of cosmology (the red shift, models of the evolving universe, tests of relativistic cosmological models), the interstellar medium, and an introduction to the theory of stellar atmospheres and stellar evolution. The present theories of pulsars, quasars, supernovae, neutron stars, Seyfert galaxies, and black holes analyzed.

50:750:352 Thermal Physics II (3)
Prerequisites: 50:750:132 Elements of Physics 2 -AND- 50:640:221 Calculus 3. 
Temperature-dependent properties of gases, liquids, and solids, such as specific heat, vapor pressure, dielectric constant, internal energy, entropy, compressibility, and conductivity. Presents classical thermodynamics, which derives relations between various quantities, and statistical methods used to derive classical thermodynamics from the atomic point of view. Presents Brownian motion, random walks, and fluctuation. Gives applications of the second law to the production and uses of energy.

50:750:354 Physics Computer Laboratory (3)
Prerequisites: 50:640:314 Differential Equations -AND- 50:750:232 Modern Physics. 
Use of the computer to solve problems in many areas of physics, including numerical integration of Newton’s Laws and Gauss’s Law, electric circuit analysis and mechanics.

50:750:374 Energy and Environment (3)(fulfills the Gen Ed PLS requirement)
No Prerequisites.
The physics, economics, and polluting properties of the three conventional power sources: coal, oil, and natural gas (including gasification of coal and oil shale). Studies solar power and discusses conservation of energy in home and industry. Considers the more important advantages and shortcomings and the environmental impacts of aspects of wind, tidal, geothermal, and magneto-hydrodynamic power; the hydrogen economy; and nuclear power, including fusion. Where appropriate, considers the possible use of these in transportation systems. Gives causes of energy crises and proposes various suggestions for a national energy policy.

50:750:408 Advanced Physics Laboratory (2)
Lab. 6 hrs. Prerequisite: 50:750:232 Modern Physics.
Students develop good experimental technique and become familiar with the capabilities and limitations of modern laboratory equipment. Experiments performed in all fields of physics including electricity and magnetism, optics, and atomic and nuclear physics.

50:750:409 Advanced Physics Laboratory (2)
Lab. 6 hrs. Prerequisite: 50:750:232 Modern Physics.
Students develop good experimental technique and become familiar with the capabilities and limitations of modern laboratory equipment. Experiments performed in all fields of physics including electricity and magnetism, optics, and atomic and nuclear physics.

50:750:414 Elements of Quantum Mechanics II (3)
Prerequisites: 50:750:232 Modern Physics -AND- 50:640:314 Differential Equations. 
Continuation of 50:750:413. Probability waves, Schrodinger and Klein-Gordon equations, eigenvalues, eigenfunctions, wave packets, unitary and hermitian operators, matrix elements, commutation relations, perturbation theory, radiative transitions, and scattering theory.

50:750:417 Computational Physics I (3)
Prerequisite: 50:750:232 Modern Physics. 
Applications of the computer to the solution of large-scale problems in physics including the numerical solution of the differential equations of electromagnetic theory, integration of the Schrodinger for realistic problems, and applications of matrix methods to problems in mechanics and engineering.

50:750:418 Computational Physics II (3)
Prerequisite: 50:750:354 Computer Lab. 
Continuation of 50:750:417. Emphasis placed on the application of computer simulation techniques, including the Monte Carlo method, to problems in statistical physics (especially the subject of phase transitions) and other areas of interest.

50:750:453 Physics Seminar (2)
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 
Members of seminar prepare and present papers on topics of interest in physics.

50:750:464 Mathematical Physics II (3)
Prerequisites: 50:750:232 Modern Physics -AND- 50:640:314 Differential Equations. 
Mathematical techniques used in advanced work in the physical sciences. Covers determinants, matrices, ordinary and partial differential equations, boundary and eigenvalue problems. Fourier-series and integrals, transform theory, orthogonal functions, complex variables. Extensive problem work.

50:750:495 Honors Program in Physics (3)

50:750:496 Honors Program in Physics (3)

Sours: https://physics.camden.rutgers.edu/physics-courses/

For the rutgers physics sciences

Courses

01:750:109,110Astronomy and Cosmology (3,3) Predominantly descriptive introduction to current ideas concerning the nature and origin of the earth, the solar system, the galaxy, and the universe; neutron stars and black holes; the "big-bang"; the possibility of life outside the earth. 109: Development of our understanding of the solar system from the time of the Greeks to the present day. 110: Current understanding of stars, galaxies, and the universe. For nonscience majors. No prerequisite. May not be taken for major credit. Courses are independent and may be taken in either order or concurrently.

01:750:115-116Extended Analytical Physics I (3,3) Together with 01:750:227, 228 forms a thorough introductory sequence. First term: graphs, orders of magnitude, units, dimensions, errors and precision, review of mathematics useful to physics, kinematics, vectors, force, and Newton's laws. Second term: energy, momentum, rotational motion, oscillations, liquids, and thermal physics, including the laws of thermodynamics and the kinetic theory of gases. Lec. 2 hrs., workshop 3 hrs. Corequisites: 01:640:112 or 115 (first term), 01:640:CALC1 (second term). Sequence 01:750:115-116 is equivalent to 01:750:123-124, if both 01:750:115 and 116 are taken. Intended for engineering students who need extra help in preparing for 01: 750:227, 228.

01:750:123-124Analytical Physics I (2,2) Forms a thorough introductory sequence together with  01:750:227, 228.�Kinematics, dynamics, energy, momentum, angular momentum, heat, and kinetic theory. Lec. 1 hr., rec. 1 hr. Corequisites: 01:640:151-152. Primarily for engineering and physics majors. This course should be followed by 01:750:227, 228 (or 204 if changing major).

01:750:140The Greenhouse Effect (3) Physical and chemical bases of the "greenhouse effect" and its global impact: biological, climatic, economic, and political. Reducing the emission of "greenhouse" gases; nuclear energy, and other alternative energy sources. For nonscience majors; may not be taken for major credit in science and engineering. Credit not given for both this course and 01:160:140, 01:450:140, or 01:556:140.

01:750:161Elements of Physics (4) Survey of major topics in physics, such as motion, fluids, waves, electricity, electrical circuits, radioactivity, relativity, and atomic structure, with emphasis on developing laboratory and problem-solving skills. Lec. 3 hrs., workshop/lab. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: 01:640: 112 or 115. Primarily for pharmacy students, but suitable for well-prepared liberal arts majors.

01:750:171,172,173,174Topics in Physics (1.5,1.5,1.5,1.5) Physical concepts of the subject without emphasis on the mathematical details. New topics chosen from time to time. Examples: recent discoveries in astronomy and astrophysics; radioactivity; symmetry principles and elementary particle physics; relativity and space travel; waves and the basic concepts of quantum mechanics; science fiction, fact, and physics; power for the future; the physics of music; cameras and lenses; the physics of high-fidelity audio systems; semiconductors and transistors. No prerequisite. Each course lasts one-half term. Graded on a pass/fail basis.

01:750:181,182,183,184Physics Honors Seminar (3,3,3,3) Physical principles and their implications, including interdisciplinary and societal issues. Topics vary by term. Extensive writing required. Prerequisite: Enrollment in an honors program or permission of department.

01:750:193-194Physics for the Sciences (4,4) Introduction to physics with biological, ecological, and chemical applications. Selected topics in mechanics, thermodynamics, fluids, waves, electricity, magnetism, optics, and modern physics. Integrated laboratory experiments. Lec. 2 hrs., workshop 1.5 hrs., lab. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: 01:640:112 or 115 or equivalent.

01:750:201-202Extended General Physics (5,5) Elementary but detailed analysis of fundamental topics. First term: review of mathematical skills useful for physics, vectors, kinematics, Newton's laws including gravitation, conservation laws, fluids, thermal physics. Second term: electricity and magnetism, geometrical�and wave optics, relativity and modern physics. Lec. 2 hrs., workshop 1.5 hrs., lab. 3 hrs. Corequisites: 01:640:112 or 115 (first term), 01:640:CALC1 (second term), or permission of instructor. Sequence 01:750:201-202 is an integrated program equivalent to 01:750:203-204 and 205-206. Intended for science, science teaching, and pre-health profession majors with a nontraditional background or who would benefit from additional support.

01:750:203-204General Physics (3,3) Elementary but detailed analysis of fundamental topics; motion, gravitation, momentum, energy, electromagnetism, waves, heat, kinetic theory, quantum effects, atomic and nuclear structures. Lec. 2 hrs., rec. 1 hr. Corequisites: 01:750:205-206 and any calculus course. Primarily for students in scientific curricula other than physics.

01:750:205-206General Physics Laboratory (1,1) Laboratory to complement 01:750:203-204. Corequisites: 01:750:203-204.

01:750:227Analytical Physics IIA (3) Electrostatics, particles in electric and magnetic fields, electromagnetism, circuits, Maxwell's equations, electromagnetic radiation. Prerequisites: 01:750:123-124 or 271. Corequisite: 01: 750:229. Primarily for engineering and physics majors.

01:750:228Analytical Physics IIB (3) Waves and optics, relativity, quantum properties of electrons and photons, wave mechanics, atomic, solid state, nuclear, and elementary particle physics. Prerequisite: 01:750:227 or 204 or 272. Corequisite: 01:750:230. Primarily for engineering and physics majors.

01:750:229-230Analytical Physics II Laboratory (1,1) Laboratory to complement 01:750:227 and 228. Corequisites: 01:750:227 and 228.

01:750:271-272Honors Physics I,II (3,3) Introduction to classical physics, covering mechanics, fluids, thermodynamics, waves, electricity, magnetism, and optics. Prerequisite: Enrollment in an honors program or permission of department. Corequisites: 01:640:CALC1 (for 271); 01:640: CALC2 (for 272).

01:750:273Honors Physics III (3) Relativity, wave and quantum properties of photons and electrons; the structure of atoms, molecules, and solids; nuclear physics; elementary particles. Prerequisites: 01:750:272 or permission of department and 01:640:CALC2.

01:750:275,276Classical Physics Laboratory (1,1) Experiments in classical physics. Prerequisite: Enrollment in an honors program or permission of department. For physics majors and honors students.

01:750:296Great Ideas That Shook Physics And The World (3)Major physical discoveries in their scientific, social, and historical contexts. Topics include the discovery of the law of universal gravitiation, the wave compared with corpuscular view of light, electromagnetic induction, the Second Law of Themodynamics and the arrow of time, light as an electromagnetic wave, Rontgen's discovery of X rays, quantum physics, the principle of relativity, and the discovery of antimatter.
Not for major credit.

01:750:301Physics of Sound (3)Scientific basis of sound: waves, vibrating systems, normal modes, Fourier analysis and synthesis, perception and measurement of sound, noise, musical instruments, room acoustics, sound recording annd reproduction, electronic sythesizers, and digital sound.
Prerequsites: Two terms of introductory physics annd two terms of calculus. Primarily for science majors.

01:750:305Modern Optics (3) Geometrical optics; electromagnetic waves, the wave equation; superposition, interference, diffraction, polarization, and coherence; holography; multilayer films, Fresnel equations; blackbody radiation, Einstein coefficients, lasers; waveguides and fiber optics; and optical properties of materials. Prerequisites: 01:640:CALC3; 01:750:227, 228 or 272, 273 or permission of instructor.

01:750:313Modern Physics (3) Relativistic mechanics, wave and quantum properties of photons and electrons, Schr�dinger equation and its application to the structure of atoms, molecules, and solids; nuclear physics; elementary particles. Prerequisites: 01:640:CALC2; 01:750:204 or 228.

01:750:323-324Advanced General Physics (3,3) For students in the general physics program and others who wish a course beyond elementary physics. Self-paced course in which the students work independently under the guidance of the instructor. The student should normally be free to participate in at least two of the scheduled periods. Material chosen from mechanics, electromagnetism, thermodynamics, optics, quantum mechanics, relativity, atomic and nuclear physics. Prerequisites: 01:750:203-204 or permission of instructor; two terms of calculus.

01:750:326Computer-Based Experimentation and Physics Computing (4) Experiments in mechanics, electromagnetism, and modern physics, emphasizing�error analysis. Uses the computer as a laboratory tool for symbolic manipulation, data collection, data analysis, simulation, and report writing. Prerequisites: 01:750:203-204, 205-206, or equivalent.

01:750:327Modern Instrumentation (3) Theory and use of integrated circuits and their interconnection to produce measuring devices, control apparatus, and interfaces for such devices to microcomputers. Prerequisites: 01:750:203-204 and 205-206, or equivalent. Required for physics majors, but also suitable for psychology, biological sciences, and other physical science majors.

01:750:341,342Principles of Astrophysics (3,3) Properties and processes of the solar system, the stars, and the galaxies; origin of the elements; evolution of the stars and the universe; neutron stars and black holes. Prerequisites: Two terms of introductory physics and two terms of calculus.

01:750:343Observational Radio Astronomy (3) Observational study of the solar system, stars, and galaxies, using the Serin 3 meter radio telescope. Emphasizes computer techniques for data reduction and analysis. Topics may include calibrating system properties, the variability of the sun, Jupiter, quasars, and mapping the distribution of hydrogen in our Milky Way galaxy and measuring its rotation. Lec. 1.5 hrs., lab. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: 01:750: 341,342 or permission of instructor. Lab schedule will vary through the term. Credit not given for both this course and 01:105:343.

01:750:344Observational Optical Astronomy (3) Observational study of the solar system, stars, and galaxies, using the Serin 0.5 meter optical telescope. Emphasizes computer techniques for data reduction and analysis. Topics may include the dimensions of lunar features, planetary satellite orbits, color-magnitude diagrams for star clusters, and the structure and colors of galaxies. Lec. 1.5 hrs., lab. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: 01:750: 341,342 or permission of instructor. Students must have nighttime hours free for observing Credit not given for both this course and 01:105:344.

01:750:351Thermal Physics (3) Principles of thermodynamics with physical and chemical applications: energy, entropy and temperature, the three laws of thermodynamics, cycles, open systems, critical phenomena, chemical equilibrium, ideal gas reactions, phase rule, phase diagrams, kinetic theory, and introduction to statistical mechanics. Prerequisites: 01:640:CALC3; 01:750:227 or 272 or permission of instructor.

01:750:361Quantum Mechanics and Atomic Physics (3) Introductory quantum mechanics: matter waves, uncertainty principle, stationary states and operators; the Schr�dinger equation and its solutions for simple potentials; the hydrogen atom, quantization of angular momentum, spin; complex atoms and molecules. Prerequisites: 01:640:CALC4; 01:750:228 or 273 or permission of instructor.

01:750:368Junior Seminar (1) Development of communication skills needed by professionals in physics and related fields. Oral and written reports, discussions of topics of current interest, and career options. For physics majors only.

01:750:381-382Mechanics (3,3) Intermediate treatment of Newtonian mechanics, including particle dynamics, rigid body motion, accelerated and rotating reference frames, Lagrange's and Hamilton`s equations. Prerequisites: 01:750:124 or 203 or 271; two terms of calculus. Corequisite: 01:640:CALC3 or permission of instructor. A theoretical course, primarily for physics majors.

01:750:385-386Electromagnetism (3,3) Intermediate course for physics majors and others who wish a thorough discussion of the fundamental laws of electromagnetism; electric and magnetic fields, dielectric and magnetic materials, d.c. and a.c.�circuits, Maxwell's equations, electromagnetic radiation. Prerequisites: 01:640:CALC3; 01:750:227 or 272 or 324 or permission of instructor.

01:750:387-388Experimental Modern Physics (3,3) Experiments in atomic, nuclear, condensed matter, and surface physics. Prerequisites: 01:750:326, 327. Corequisite: 01:750: 313 or 361 or permission of instructor. Credit not given for both 01: 750:387 and 389.

01:750:389Experimental Applied Physics (3) Experiments in classical and modern physics emphasizing techniques useful for applications. Prerequisites: 01:750:326, 327. Corequisite: 01:750: 313 or 361 or permission of instructor. Credit not given for both 01:750: 387 and 389.

01:750:397Physics of Modern Devices (3) Physical laws and principles underlying modern devices and processes; examples including motors, generators, refrigerators, vacuum tubes, transistors, radio and television receivers, computers, rockets, nuclear reactors, radiation detectors, lasers, and holograms. Prerequisites: Two terms of introductory physics and a course in calculus.

01:750:406Introductory Solid State Physics (3) Fundamental properties of metals, insulators, and semiconductors;�dielectrics, magnetism, superconductivity. Prerequisites: 01:750:361 and 386, or permission of instructor.

01:750:417Intermediate Quantum Mechanics (3) Vector space formulation, operators, eigenfuctions, bound states, angular momentum, central potentials, approximation methods, scattering. Prerequisite: 01:750:361.

01:750:418Nuclei and Particles (3) Nuclear forces and models; classification and interactions of elementary particles. Prerequisite: 01:750:361.

01:750:441Stars and Star Formation (3) Observed properties of stars. Internal structure of stars, energy generation and transport, neutrinos, solar oscillations. Evolution of isolated and double stars, red giants, white dwarfs, variable stars, supernovae. Challenges presented by formation of stars, importance of magnetic fields. Pre-main sequence stellar evolution. Prerequisites: 01:750:361, 385-386. Credit not given for both this course and 01:105:441.

01:750:442High Energy Astrophysics and Radiative Processes (3) Radiation and scattering processes in plasma. Detection of X and gamma rays. Supernovae and remants, pulsars. Gamma-ray bursts, accretion disks, and binary star outbursts. Quasars and active galactic nuclei, cosmic rays. Prerequisites: 01:750:361, 385-386. Credit not given for both this course and 01:105:442.

01:750:443Galaxies and the Milky Way (3) Properties of galaxies: photometry, kinematics, and masses. Disk galaxies: spiral patterns, bars and warps, gas content, star formation rates, chemical evolution. Elliptical galaxies: shapes. Structure of the Milky Way. Nature of dark matter. Prerequisites: 01:750:381-382, 385-386. Credit not given for both this course and 01:105:443.

01:750:444Introduction to Cosmology (3) Expansion of the universe, techniques for distance estimation. Large-scale structure of the universe. Cosmological models: open, closed, flat, and accelerating universes. Microwave background: observations, properties, and origin. Problems of standard cosmology and preliminary concept of inflation. Prerequisites: 01:750:361, 385-386. Credit not given for both this course and 01:105:444.

01:750:451Physical Oceanography (4) Principles of ocean physics. Mass, momentum, heat, and freshwater conservation and atmospheric exchange. Influence of Earth's rotation. The ocean's role in climate. Tides, waves, and currents. Effects of ocean circulation on its biology and chemistry. Two 80-min. lecs., one 55-min. rec. Credit not given for both this course and 01:628:451, 11:628:451, 16:712:501. Prerequisite: 01:750:204.

01:750:464Mathematical Physics (3) Physical applications of linear algebra, the exterior calculus, differential forms, complexes and cohomology. Applications include Hamiltonian dynamics, normal mode analysis, Markov processes, thermodynamics, Schr�dinger's equation, special relativity, electrostatics, magnetostatics, Maxwell's equations, and wave equations. Prerequisite: 01:640:423 or equivalent.

01:750:487,488Special Topics in Physics (3,3) Study of selected areas in physics. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

01:750:491,492Research in Physics (BA,BA) Independent research supervised by a member of the department. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

01:750:493,494Independent Study in Physics (1-4,1-4) Independent study supervised by a member of the department. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

01:750:495,496Honors in Physics (1-4,1-4) Supervised independent reading or research in theoretical or experimental physics culminating in an essay. Prerequisite: Invitation of chairperson.

01:750:497,498Honors in Astronomy (1-4,1-4) Supervised independent reading or research in astronomy, culminating in an essay. Prerequisite: Invitation of chairperson. Credit not given for both this course and 01:105:497,498.

Sours: https://catalogs.rutgers.edu/generated/nb-ug_0507/pg20665.html
Rutgers Day Physics Demo Show! 4/25/20

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