Ipod nano types

Ipod nano types DEFAULT

iPod Nano

Discontinued line of portable media players by Apple

‹ The templateInfobox information appliance is being considered for merging. ›

IPodlogo.png
7th Generation iPod Nano.svg

iPod Nano 7th Generation in Space Gray

DeveloperApple Inc.
ManufacturerFoxconn
Product familyiPod
TypePortable media player
LifespanSeptember 7, 2005 – July 27, 2017 (11 years, 10 months)
DiscontinuedJuly 27, 2017[1]
Operating system1.3.1 (1st Gen)
1.1.3 (2nd, 3rd Gen)
1.0.4 (4th Gen)
1.0.2 (5th Gen)
1.2 (6th Gen)
1.0.4/1.1.2 (7th Gen)
Storage1-16 GBflash memory
Display1st–2nd Gen: 176 × 132 px, 1.5 in (38 mm), color LCD
3rd Gen: 320 × 240 px, 2 in (51 mm), color LCD
4th Gen: 240 × 320 px, 2 in (51 mm), color LCD
5th Gen: 240 × 376 px, 2.22 in (56 mm), color LCD
6th Gen: 240 × 240 px, 1.55 in (39 mm), color LCD
7th Gen: 240 × 432 px, 2.5 in (64 mm), color LCD
Input1st–5th Gen:Click wheel
6th–7th Gen:Multi-touchtouchscreen
Connectivity1st–6th Gen: 3.5mm headphone jack (TRS connector), 30-pin connector
7th Gen: 3.5mm headphone jack (TRS connector), Bluetooth 4.0, Lightning connector
PowerLithium-ion battery
PredecessoriPod Mini
SuccessorApple Watch
iPod Touch
Related articlesiPod Classic
iPod Shuffle
iPod Touch
Websitewww.apple.com/ipod-nano/

The iPod Nano (stylised and marketed as iPod nano) is a discontinued portable media player designed and formerly marketed by Apple Inc. The first generation model was introduced on September 7, 2005, as a replacement for the iPod Mini,[2] using flash memory for storage. The iPod Nano went through several differing models, or generations, since its introduction. Apple discontinued the iPod Nano on July 27, 2017.[1][3]

Development[edit]

Development work on the design of the iPod Nano started only nine months before its launch date.[4] The Nano was launched in two colors (black and white) with two available sizes: 2 GB (roughly 500 songs) and 4 GB (1000 songs).[2] On February 7, 2006, Apple updated the lineup with the 1 GB model (240 songs).[5] Apple also released some accessories, including armbands and silicone "tubes" designed to bring color to the Nano and protect it from scratches, as well as a combination lanyard-earphone accessory that hangs around the neck and avoids the problem of tangled earphone cords. The current models with Bluetooth headphones have a similar advantage.

History[edit]

1st generation[edit]

Black first-generation iPod Nano

On September 7, 2005, Apple introduced the iPod Nano at a media event with Steve Jobs pointing to the small watch pocket in his jeans and asking, "Ever wonder what this pocket is for?"[6] Advertising emphasized the iPod Nano's small size: 40 millimetres (1.6 in) wide, 90 millimetres (3.5 in) long, 6.9 millimetres (0.27 in) thick and weighing 42 grams (1.5 oz). The stated battery life was up to 14 hours, while the screen was 176×132 pixels, 38 millimetres (1.5 in) diagonal, displaying 65,536 colors (16-bit color).[7] 1, 2, and 4 GB capacities were available. On November 11, 2011, Apple announced a recall on this model of iPod nano. The recall was issued due to a battery overheat issue. This recall applied to iPod nanos sold between September 2005 and December 2006.[8]

2nd generation[edit]

On September 25, 2006, Apple updated the Nano line. The second-generation Nano featured scratch-resistant, anodized aluminum casing like the earlier Mini's design; the multiple color choices mirrored those of the Mini as well. However, unlike the second-generation Mini, the button labels were grey instead of matching the Nano's casing (except for the black Nano, which had a black click wheel). The second-generation Nano featured a 40% brighter, "more vibrant" display,[9] a battery life upgrade (from 14 to 24 hours), and storage sizes doubled to 2, 4, and 8 GB models. The second generation also introduced gapless playback of audio files, along with a new search option.

The 2 GB model was available in silver only. The 4 GB was originally available in green, blue, silver, or pink, and the 8 GB model was initially only available in black - red was later added for 4 and 8 GB models. Apple claimed that the second generation iPod Nano's packaging was "32% lighter with 52% less volume than the first generation",[10] thereby reducing environmental impact and shipping costs.

On October 13, 2006, Apple announced a special edition iPod Nano; Product Red, with a red exterior and 4 GB of storage. For each red iPod Nano sold in the United States, Apple donates US$10 to the Product Red initiative, while retaining the regular price.[11] On November 3, 2006, Apple introduced a red 8 GB model, due to "outstanding customer demand", again retaining the same price point of the equivalent black model.[12]

3rd generation[edit]

A black 8 GB 3rd generation iPod Nano.

Apple updated the Nano again with its tiny design on September 5, 2007. The third-generation Nano featured a 2-inch (51 mm) QVGA (320 x 240) screen and a shorter, wider, heavier design, with new colors. New features included browsing via Cover Flow, a new user interface, video playback, and support for new iPod Games. Users had to repurchase games bought a month before the debut of the new iPod as they were not supported. The Nano was announced in a 4 GB version coming in silver and an 8 GB version coming in silver, turquoise, mint green, black, and Product Red. The battery lasted for approx. 24 hours on audio playback and approx. 5 hours on video playback. On January 22, 2008, Apple released a pink version of the 8 GB iPod Nano.

Combining elements from previous generations of the iPod Nano, the third-generation Nano had an aluminum front plate and a stainless steel back plate. The Nano also sported a new minimalistic hold switch, similar to the iPod Shuffle's power switch, which had been moved to the bottom of the player. The 2-inch (51 mm) screen had the highest pixel density of any Apple product at the time, having the same pixel count as the 2.5-inch (64 mm) display of the iPod Classic.

On October 6, 2007, Apple released a firmware update (1.0.2) via iTunes that was said to improve Cover Flow and yield faster menu navigation.[13] The update was also released for the iPod Classic. On November 28, 2007, Apple released another firmware update (1.0.3) via iTunes, which included unspecified bugfixes. January 15, 2008 saw the release of version 1.1, which added support for iTunes movie rentals, music song lyrics support and included more unspecified bugfixes. Apple released update version 1.1.2 in May 2008 and version 1.1.3 in July 2008 with even more bug fixes.

4th generation[edit]

4th generation iPod Nano.

At the Apple Let's Rock Event on September 9, 2008, the iPod Nano Fourth Generation was officially announced.[14] It returned to the narrow form factor of the 1st and 2nd Generation model, while retaining and rotating the 51-millimetre (2.0 in) screen from the 3rd gen model. It was also thinner than the first, second, and third generation Nano, measuring 90.7 millimetres (3.57 in) tall by 38.7 millimetres (1.52 in) wide by 6.2 millimetres (0.24 in) thick, and weighing 36.8 grams (1.30 oz). It had a curved aluminum shell and glass screen (the glass screen being held in place with nothing but the shell). Apple claimed the battery would last 24 hours of music playback, and only 4 hours of video playback, compared to the 5 hours of the previous generation.

The six previous colors (silver, black, mint, turquoise, berry red, and rose pink) were replaced by silver, black, purple, light blue, green, yellow, orange, red and pink, for a total of nine, although the Product Red color was only available directly from Apple (website and retail stores). Apple marketed the new colors as "Nano-chromatic". Also added was an accelerometer which allows the Nano to shuffle songs by shaking it, the option between portrait and landscape display modes by tilting the iPod left or right, and access to Cover Flow when tilted sideways.[15] Videos, however, could only be played in landscape mode. The user interface was also refreshed, adding a more stylized look in keeping with the new hardware design. It included a new voice recording feature which started automatically when an Apple compatible microphone is plugged in. It also included the new "Genius" feature, introduced by Apple the same day. The Genius feature automatically creates playlists based on a selected song using an algorithm built by Apple.

It was additionally touted as "the most environmentally friendly iPodApple has ever made", containing arsenic-free glass and a BFR-, mercury-, and PVC-free design. It was also claimed to be highly recyclable. The iPod Nano fourth-generation was shipped in cases similar to the second-generation ones with the clear view in the front, and is marketed in three models: 4 GB (limited production to Europe only) and 8 GB and 16 GB. Limited quantities of an unannounced 4 GB model surfaced in various markets.[16] Also, the iPod Quiz game was dropped and replaced with a Maze game which makes use of the iPod's accelerometer similarly to such games on the iPhone and iPod Touch.

The fourth generation dropped support for charging via FireWire. "This change means that any dock accessories that use the dock connector's FireWire pins to send power—many older speakers and car chargers, for example—will not charge the fourth-generation iPod Nano."[17]

5th generation[edit]

5th generation iPod Nano camera and microphone.

At Apple's September 9, 2009 event, a fifth generation iPod Nano was unveiled with reduced prices on the larger model (at the time of release, the 8GB was priced at $149 and the 16GB at $179), a larger, 56.3 millimetres (2.22 in) diagonal screen (up from 50.8 millimetres (2.00 in) in third and fourth generation iPod Nanos), which was also wider,[18] integrated video camera with 16 special effects, microphone, FM radio with iTunes tagging (via RDS) multiple radio regions including Americas, Asia, Australia, Europe, and Japan.

As well as continuing to support picture viewing and video playback, it also included Live Pause, a built-in pedometer, Nike+iPod Support and a speaker.[18][19] This model also had the Genius Mix feature installed.

The headphone jack and dock connector swapped locations so that the headphone jack was to the left of the dock connector. Therefore, the fifth generation iPod Nano used a different Apple Universal Dock insert than the fourth generation.[20]

The fifth generation iPod Nano had nine finishes: Silver, Black, Purple, Blue, Yellow, Orange, Product Red, Green, and Pink. All had a glossier, shinier finish than the fourth generation. Just like the fourth-generation iPod Nano, Product Red Nano was only available on the Apple Online Store and Apple Retail Store.

This generation was discontinued on September 1, 2010.

6th generation[edit]

6th generation iPod Nano.

At a media event on September 1, 2010, Apple announced the sixth generation iPod Nano, which, among many new features, was designed around a high-resolution square touch-screen.[21]

The device featured a small 1.55-inch multi-touch screen with a lower resolution of 240×240 pixels but a higher pixel density of 220 pixels per inch,[22] as opposed to the larger 2.2-inch screen on the fifth-generation iPod Nano. The device had a 0.39 watt-hour battery rated at 3.7 volts, giving a capacity of 105 mAh,[23] and specified to give 24 hours of music playback on a single full charge. The device takes about three hours for one full charge. The device retained the same 30-pin dock connector as previous generations. This Nano lost the previous generation's video camera, built-in voice recorder microphone (although plugging in headphones with a built in microphone revealed a Voice Memos app) and built-in speaker, and games. It also lost support for video playback,[24] but music videos and video podcasts (vodcasts) could be synced onto the device, and the audio from them would play on the device, with a single key-frame shown on the screen.[25] It still included the Nike+iPod fitness option as well as an FM radio tuner with RDS (Radio Data System). It had a black on white screen contrast option and other accessibility options. The 6th generation iPod Nano had the same price point as the 5th generation device.

A firmware update (version 1.1) for the Nano was released on February 28, 2011. The update added the ability to change songs or pause with a double click of the sleep/wake button. It also added the ability to turn the device off by holding the sleep/wake button. The user interface was also enhanced. On October 4, 2011, the iPod Nano 1.2 update was unveiled at the Apple "Let's Talk iPhone" event at the Town Hall, 4 Infinite Loop. This update added the option to increase or decrease the size of the home buttons for easier use. The update also added a better fitness app, which had a better pedometer split into walking and running style. The update also included 16 new clock faces, which included designs like a Nixie tube clock face or an old-style clock face, and Disney-licensed designs, such as Mickey Mouse and Kermit the Frog, bringing to a total of 18 clock faces. Three more background images were also added.[26]

Although not specifically designed as one, some accessory makers produced watch bands for the 6th generation Nano, allowing it to be worn like a watch.[27] In September 2013, TUAW compared the iPod Nano to the Samsung Galaxy Gear, and considered the three-year-old model to be a "better, cheaper smartwatch" than the Galaxy Gear because of its more complete functionality in comparison,[28] and its inclusion of a headphone jack.

7th generation[edit]

7th generation iPod Nanos.
A 2015 model of the 7th-generation iPod Nano having the Product Redcolor scheme.

Apple announced the seventh and final generation iPod Nano on September 12, 2012. The (maximum) internal storage capacity has not been increased compared with the previous model but only a single, 16GB version of the seventh generation iPod Nano was announced at the product launch. Apple described it as their "thinnest iPod ever." It is 38% thinner (5.4 mm) than the Nano it replaces (8.78 mm), and adds the ability to use Bluetooth 4.0 wireless headsets, speakers and other devices (such as heart-rate monitors). It still included the Nike+iPod fitness option as well as an FM radio tuner which works when connected to headphones or a stereo jack. On 15 July 2015, Apple refreshed the iPod Nano, offering only 5 more subdued colours (gold, silver, blue, pink and space grey) compared to the original 7 jewel tones, in addition to the (Product) Red model. On July 27, 2017, Apple discontinued the iPod Nano, along with the iPod shuffle, making the iPod touch the last model of the iPod line.

The 7th generation featured a 2.5 inch, touch-sensitive 432x240 display at 202 PPI, Bluetooth 4.0 (with support for NIKE+ iPod wireless systems), and a Lightning connector to replace the original 30-pin dock connector. Although its software resembles the iOS user interface, it is not an iOS device. The current and final version of the iPod software for this device is 1.0.4 for the initial release model and 1.1.2 for the mid 2015 refresh model.

Specifications[edit]

Generation and Appearance Capacity Colours Connection Original release date Minimum OS to sync Rated battery life (hours)Screen (pixels)Audio processorOn-board RAMPhysical size Weight
1st 1st generation iPod Nano.1 GB Black
White
USB
(FireWire for
charging only)
February 7, 2006 Mac: 10.3.4
Windows: 2000[29]

iTunes 5 or later
Audio: 14
Slideshow: 4
176×132
145 PPI (16Bit Colour)
Wolfson
WM8975G[30]
32 MB 89 mm
41 mm
6.9 mm
42.5 g
(1.5 oz)
2 GB September 7, 2005
4 GB
Replaced Mini. Colour screen for picture viewing; 1 GB version released later.
2nd 2G Nano iPod.svg2 GB Silver USB
(FireWire for
charging only)
September 12, 2006 Mac: 10.3.9
Windows: 2000[31]

iTunes 7 or later
Audio: 24
Slideshow: 5
176×132
145 PPI (16Bit Colour)
Wolfson
WM8975[32]
32 MB 89 mm
41 mm
6.6 mm
40 g
(1.41 oz)
4 GB Silver
Blue
Green
Pink
(Product) Red[Note 1]October 13, 2006
8 GB Black September 12, 2006
(Product) Red [Note 1]November 3, 2006
Anodized aluminium casing with plastic top and bottom; 6 colours available.
3rd 4 GB 3rd generation iPod Nano4 GB   Silver USB
(FireWire for
charging only)
September 5, 2007 Mac: 10.4.8
Windows: XP

iTunes 7.4 or later
Audio: 24
Video: 5
320×240
204 PPI
Wolfson
WM1870[33]
32 MB 70 mm
52 mm
6.6 mm
49.3 g
(1.74 oz)
8 GB   Silver

  Blue
  Green
  Black
  (Product) Red [Note 1]

  Pink January 22, 2008
51 mm QVGA screen; lighter color shades and chrome back; new interface; video-playing capability.
4th 4th generation iPod Nano (black model pictured).8 GB

  Silver
  Black
  Purple
  Blue
  Green
  Yellow
  Orange
  Pink
  (Product) Red [Note 1]

USBSeptember 9, 2008 Mac: 10.4.11
Windows: XP

iTunes 8 or later
Audio: 24
Video: 4[24]
240×320
204 PPI
Cirrus Logic CS42L58[34]32 MB 91 mm
38 mm
6.1 mm
36.8 g
(1.3 oz)
16 GB
Curved enclosure and new colors; revised interface; voice recording features; "shake to shuffle"; accelerometer; limited 4 GB models[16]
5th Purple iPod Nano 5G with camera, front and back views8 GB

  Black
  Silver
  Purple
  Pink
  Yellow
  Blue
  Green
  Orange
  (Product) Red [Note 1]

USBSeptember 13, 2009 Mac: 10.4.11
Windows: XP

iTunes 9 or later
Audio: 24
Video: 5[24]
240×376
204 PPI
0.3 megapixel camera
Cirrus Logic CLI1480A[34]64 MB 91 mm
38 mm
6.1 mm
36.3 g
(1.28 oz)
16 GB
Polished aluminium case including a larger screen, video camera, built-in microphone, FMradio tuner, Recorder and a pedometer. Retains entire color line from fourth generation.
6th 6th generation silver iPod Nano8 GB

  Silver
  Graphite
  Blue
  Green
  Orange
  Pink
  (Product) Red [Note 1]

USBSeptember 1, 2010 Mac: 10.5.8
Windows: XP

iTunes 10 or later
Audio: 24[24]240×240
220 PPI
Cirrus Logic CLI1544C0[34]64 MB[35]37.5 mm
41 mm
8.78 mm
21.1 g
(0.74 oz)
16 GB
Multi-touch screen. No click-wheel, camera, or video playback. The 1.1 OS update brought the ability of turning off by holding the wake/sleep button. Same price range as the 5th generation, except in Europe, Japan and Australia. Features iOS-like interface design and still contains "shake to shuffle", FM radio, and pedometer. The 1.2 OS update added built-in accelerometer support which works with Nike+iPod without the need to attach a Nike+ receiver or shoe sensor.[36]
7th 7th generation silver iPod Nano.16 GB   Slate(2012–2013)USBOctober 12, 2012 Mac: 10.6.8
Windows: XP

iTunes 10.7 or later
Audio: 30
Video: 3.5[24]
240×432
202 PPI
Cirrus Logic CLI1599A1[37]64 MB 76.5 mm
39.6 mm
5.4 mm
31 g
(1.1 oz)
  Space gray (2013–)

2012–2015
  Silver
  Pink
  Yellow
  Green
  Blue
  Purple
 (Product) Red[Note 1]

2015 models

  Space gray
  Silver
  Gold
  Pink
  Blue
 (Product) Red[Note 1]

July 15, 2015 Mac: 10.7.5
Windows: 7

iTunes 12.2 or later
New, larger 2.5 inch Multi-Touch screen, and "Home button" similar to iPhone but does not run iOS. Unibody now made of anodized aluminium. Also, with larger screen, supports video playback. The 30-pin dock connector has been replaced by the new Lightning connector. Bluetooth 4.0 wireless connectivity. New "Space Gray" color option replaces "Slate" as of September 10, 2013. New colors were introduced on July 15, 2015.[38] Discontinued on July 27, 2017.
  1. ^ abcdefghIs a Special Edition color exclusively available on Apple's website.

Supported audio formats[edit]

Lossy:

Lossless/original PCM:

Other container:

Reception[edit]

The size of the package was reduced 50 percent with the introduction of the 2nd generation.[39]The 4th and 5th generation packaging mimics this packaging, while the 3rd generation used a larger but otherwise similar version of it.

The initial consumer response to the iPod Nano was overwhelmingly positive and sales were heavy.[40] The Nano sold its first million units in 17 days, helping Apple Inc. to a record billion-dollar profit in 2005.[41]

Apple's release of the iPod Nano as a replacement for the iPod Mini was viewed by many as a risky move.[42]Steve Jobs argued that the iPod Nano was a necessary risk since competitors were beginning to catch up to the iPod Mini in terms of design and features, and believed the iPod Nano would prove to be even more popular and successful than the iPod Mini.

Within days of the Nano's release, some users reported damage to the Nano, suggesting that the LCD screen had become so scratched that it was unreadable, even when the backlight was on. Many reported fine scratches on Nanos, caused by microfiber cloths. Other owners reported that their Nano's screen cracked without use of excessive force.[43] On September 27, 2005, Apple confirmed that a small percentage ("less than 1/10 of 1 percent") of iPod Nanos shipped with a faulty screen and agreed to replace any that had cracked screens, but denied the iPod Nano was more susceptible to scratching than prior iPods.[44] Apple started shipping iPod Nanos with a protective sleeve to protect them from scratches. In October 2005 a class action lawsuit was filed against Apple, with the plaintiffs seeking reimbursement for the device, legal fees, and "unlawful or illegal profits" from sales of the iPod Nano. Lawyers for the plaintiffs claimed that the devices "scratch excessively during normal usage, rendering the screen on the Nanos unreadable, and violating state consumer protection statutes".[45] Similar lawsuits were later filed in Mexico and the United Kingdom.[46] In early 2009, Apple was in the process of settling a court case over the scratched iPod Nano screens. It was suggested that Apple should set aside $22 million to refund users. At the time, it required a Judge's sign-off on the terms by April 28, 2009.[47] Some commentators such as BusinessWeek's Arik Hesseldahl have criticized the lawsuits. Hesseldahl dismissed them as "stupid" and suggested that they benefitted "no one but the trial lawyers," but also suggested that Apple could have avoided litigation by offering "full refunds on unwanted Nanos" instead of charging a re-stocking fee and lengthening the return period from 14 days (when purchased through Apple retail or online) to 30 or 60 days.[48]

Another issue that the public started to realise over the course of a couple months of heavy usage, is that since the battery gets stressed it will begin to expand inside the aluminum casing, people won't realise it at first until a small black dot starts appearing on the display, this is due to the battery pressing against the display panel. Over time the spot would get bigger as the battery swells more as it presses further against the display, eventually it will cause the display to break. However it is not an easy repair as you need to slide the components out of the metal case with an addition that the battery pressed against the case will make it more difficult to tear the device apart, the battery terminals are also soldered to the board.

Incidents[edit]

In Australia, an iPod Nano caught fire while being charged on a PC.[49][50]

In another incident, a man's iPod Nano set his pants on fire while he was working at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport.[51]

In addition, an iPod Nano sparked in Japan in January 2008 while it was recharging.[52] Although no one was injured during the incident, Apple Inc. investigated the incident.[53] It was reported on August 19, 2008 that 17 incidents of abnormal overheating with first generation iPod Nano units while recharging had been reported in Japan, including cases in which tatami mats had been charred.[54] On August 10, 2010, Apple Japan released a statement saying that it would replace any iPod Nanos that overheated.[55][56]

Since 2010, users have been reporting the 6th generation iPod Nano's sleep/wake button remains stuck after months of use, making it impossible to activate the device without the help of a computer or a dock accessory.[57] According to a technical inspection, the device uses double-sided tape to hold the button in place, indicating a possible design fault.[58]

On November 11, 2011, Apple announced the iPod Nano (1st generation) Replacement Program, intended to address concerns over overheating batteries.[59] Customers with affected devices can fill out a claim form to confirm eligibility for replacement. Defective devices will be replaced within six weeks and will carry 90-day warranties. Customers who have personalized iPod Nano devices will not be able to receive personalization on their replacement devices.[60] During the replacement process, there have been several reports of users receiving an iPod Nano 6th generation as replacement instead of the expected 1st generation device that users sent in during the recall.[61] Because using the iPod nano 6th generation with a Mac computer requires iTunes 10 or higher, which in turn requires Mac OS X Leopard system software, Apple will upgrade the system software of participants running earlier versions of macOS, on request[citation needed] but this leaves users that do not have access to iTunes without a working device (because Apple changed the hashing of the music database which prevented the 6th generation iPod Nano from being used with open source software via libgpod).[62]

Timeline of compact iPod models

See also: Timeline of full-sized iPod models and Timeline of iPod models and related products

Sources: Apple press release library,[63]Mactracker Apple Inc. model database[64]

References[edit]

  1. ^ ab"Apple discontinues iPod nano and shuffle". 9to5Mac. July 27, 2017. Retrieved July 27, 2017.
  2. ^ ab"Apple Introduces iPod Nano" (Press release). Apple Inc. September 7, 2005. Archived from the original on October 18, 2012. Retrieved December 23, 2006.
  3. ^Huddleston Jr, Tom (July 27, 2017). "Apple Is Discontinuing the iPod Nano and Shuffle". Fortune.
  4. ^Grossman, Lev (September 12, 2005). "Stevie's Little Wonder". Time. Archived from the original on September 12, 2005. Retrieved October 3, 2006.
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  6. ^Pachal, Peter (October 8, 2011). "Remembering Steve Jobs: His Best Keynote Moments". PCMag.com. Retrieved November 15, 2011.
  7. ^iPod Nano (1st Generation) Technical Speifications – Apple.com
  8. ^"iPod nano (1st generation) Replacement Program". Apple Inc. November 11, 2011. Archived from the original on November 12, 2011.
  9. ^"Apple Introduces the New iPod Nano" (Press release). Apple Inc. September 12, 2006. Archived from the original on October 18, 2012.
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  11. ^"Apple Announces iPod Nano (PRODUCT) RED Special Edition". Apple press release. Apple Inc. October 13, 2006. Archived from the original on January 14, 2007. Retrieved January 13, 2007.
  12. ^"Apple Announces New 8GB Model of iPod Nano (PRODUCT) RED Special Edition". Apple press release. Apple Inc. November 3, 2006. Archived from the original on January 4, 2007. Retrieved January 7, 2007.
  13. ^"iPod Classic, Nano updated to 1.0.2". MacNN. October 6, 2007. Retrieved January 22, 2008.
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  16. ^ abTopolsky, Joshua (September 17, 2008). "Official: Mysterious new 4GB iPod nano 4Gs begin appearing on store shelves". Engadget. Retrieved September 17, 2008.
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  19. ^"iTunes – Partner with iTunes". Apple. Retrieved September 2, 2010.
  20. ^"Learn about Apple Universal Dock". Support.apple.com. April 22, 2010. Retrieved September 2, 2010.
  21. ^"Apple unveils new TV box for renting movies, shows – Yahoo! News". News.yahoo.com. Retrieved September 2, 2010.
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  28. ^"Confused by the Galaxy Gear? Apple released a better, cheaper watch in 2010". TUAW. AOL. Retrieved January 24, 2014.
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  38. ^Apple unveils new iPods, including gold color options Retrieved on July 20, 1025.
  39. ^"Apple and the Environment". Apple.com. Apple Inc. Archived from the original on August 21, 2006. Retrieved October 22, 2006.
  40. ^Myers, Michelle (September 10, 2005). "Apple store buzzes with Nano fever". CNet. Retrieved September 15, 2005.
  41. ^Daniel Drew Turner (October 11, 2005). "Apple Hits $1 billion in Profit for 2005". eWeek. Retrieved January 3, 2006.
  42. ^Burrows, Peter (September 13, 2005). "iPod nano: Will small size mean big sales?". BusinessWeek.
  43. ^Angell, Larry (September 25, 2005). "iPod nano screen complaints abound". iLounge. Retrieved September 27, 2005.
  44. ^Dalrymple, Jim (September 27, 2005). "Apple responds to iPod Nano screen concerns". Macworld. Retrieved September 28, 2005.
  45. ^Jade, Kasper; Katie Marshal (October 21, 2005). "iPod Nano owners sue Apple over screen issues". AppleInsider. Retrieved October 21, 2005.
  46. ^"Nano lawsuit goes international". BBC News. November 8, 2005. Retrieved May 10, 2006.
  47. ^"Apple Settles iPod Nano Scratch Lawsuit with $25 Refund". Macrumors.com. January 23, 2009. Retrieved November 29, 2011.
  48. ^Hesseldahl, Arik (October 27, 2005). "iPod nano Lawsuits: Who Wins?". BusinessWeek. Retrieved November 8, 2005.
  49. ^"Exploding iPod dies gruesome death". Engadget. April 12, 2007.
  50. ^"Gadgets: iPod nano Explodes During Charge". Gizmodo. April 2, 2007.
  51. ^"iPod Sets Man's Pants On Fire – News Story – WSB Atlanta". Wsbtv.com. October 5, 2007. Archived from the original on June 29, 2011. Retrieved November 29, 2011.Alt URL
  52. ^"iPod nano Sparks Investigation in Japan – GridLock – Just another KM / Tech Blog". Arjunthomas.com. Retrieved November 29, 2011.
  53. ^iPod nano emits sparks, Japan's government says, Tech News on ZDNet.
  54. ^17 overheating incidents involving old iPods while recharging[permanent dead link], JNN News, (August 19, 2008). Retrieved on August 19, 2008. (in Japanese)
  55. ^"Apple says to replace overheating iPods in Japan". Reuters. August 11, 2010. Retrieved September 2, 2010.
  56. ^Koh, Yoree (August 12, 2010). "Apple Japan to Swap iPods that Overheat". The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved September 2, 2010.
  57. ^View: Everyone Only Notes (September 19, 2010). "Stuck sleep/wake button?: Apple Support Communities". Discussions.apple.com. Retrieved March 2, 2014.
  58. ^"iPod Nano 6th Generation Stuck Buttons". Rbarrios.com. Retrieved March 14, 2017.
  59. ^Apple – Support – iPod nano Replacement Program, page on Apple Support site
  60. ^Apple Launches Worldwide Replacement Program for First-Generation iPod Nano – Mac Rumors
  61. ^Pollicino, Joe (December 21, 2011). "Apple reportedly swapping recalled iPod nanos for 6G counterparts; you have yours?". Engadget. Retrieved December 21, 2011.
  62. ^"Libgpod - gtkpod iPod Manager". Gtkpod.org. October 15, 2011. Retrieved November 17, 2012.
  63. ^Apple Inc., Apple press release library, Retrieved September 19, 2007.
  64. ^Mactracker (mactracker.ca), Apple Inc. model database, version as of July 26, 2007.

External links[edit]

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Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IPod_Nano

Fifteen years ago today, on October 23rd, 2001, Steve Jobs stood up on stage and announced the original iPod. Since that day, the iPod has changed the way people buy and listen to music, sold millions of devices, and laid the foundation for the powerhouses that Apple has had with the iPhone and iPad.


And while the classic iPod design was finally retired two years ago, and the remaining members of the iPod line are less important to Apple’s strategy today than they were years ago, it’s still an integral part of history, both for the company and the larger tech industry.

So here’s a look back at some highlights in the history of the king of MP3 players, from the physically scrolling plastic wheel of the original iPod to the smooth glass and aluminum of today’s iPod Touch.

iPod (first generation) [2001]

The one that started it all, the original iPod launched exactly 15 years ago today for $399. It featured a 5GB hard drive, a FireWire port for syncing, and a physically rotating scroll wheel. A slightly updated second-generation version swapped the scroll wheel for a touch-based one and added Windows support.

iPod (third generation) [2003]

The first major redesign for the iPod, and perhaps the farthest departure from the now iconic clickwheel that’s associated with the product, the third generation moved the media controls as separate touch-sensitive buttons on top of the scroll wheel. It also introduced the now-defunct 30-pin iPod connector, which would be the port of choice for all of Apple’s mobile devices until the Lightning connector was introduced in 2012.

iPod Mini [2004]

The iPod mini was a smaller, thinner iPod with less storage (either 4GB or 6GB), but came in a variety of fun colors. More importantly, it’s the first iPod model to introduce the click wheel, which would remain a staple of the iPod design for the rest of the product’s history.

iPod (fourth generation) [2004]

The fourth generation iPod is probably the image most people have in mind when they think of an iPod: a white plastic front with a gray click wheel. Available first in a black and white version, followed by a later iPod Photo model with a color screen.

iPod (U2 Edition) [2004]

Apple also famously released variant U2 editions of the fourth-generation iPod (both B/W and color models) and the later fifth-generation iPod in a special black and red color scheme, along with laser-etched signatures of the band on the back of the case.

iPod Shuffle (first generation) [2005]

The original iPod Shuffle was the first iPod to use flash memory, and also literally looked like a flash drive, complete with removable USB cap. With no screen, it was introduced as a lower cost, budget model iPod, a role its successor still fulfills in the product lineup today.

iPod Nano (first generation) [2005]

The iPod Mini was small, but a the iPod Nano looked almost impossibly thin when it was first released. (It was 0.3 inches thick.) The original Nano was only available in black or white, but a second-generation model brought back the colorful aluminum casing that the Mini had popularized.

iPod (fifth generation) [2005]

The fifth-generation iPod got a wider body and screen as Apple turned its attention to video, adding TV shows, music videos, and later on, full movies to the iTunes Store. The fifth-generation model also was the first full-size iPod model to also come in black, in addition to the original white.

iPod Touch (first generation) [2007]

Released a few months after the original iPhone, the iPod Touch offered a similar iOS experience for users that didn’t want to get on board just yet with Apple’s vision of the cellular future.

iPod Classic [2007]

The last model of the original iPod, the iPod Classic refreshed the software and replaced the plastic front casing with aluminum. The highest capacity model offered 160GB of storage, which remains the highest capacity iPod ever sold. It was discontinued in September 2014.

iPod Nano (fifth generation) [2009]

Apple used the Nano brand to experiment a lot with various form factors, including the squashed third-gen Nano, and the elongated fourth-generation model. A fifth-generation refresh added a video camera and a speaker.

iPod Touch (fourth Generation) [2010]

The second and third-generation iPod Touch models offered a new tapering design and speaker, with increasingly more powerful hardware that would trickle down from improvements to the iPhone. The fourth-generation Touch would further slim down the design, along with adding both front- and rear-facing cameras for FaceTime support and a Retina display.

iPod Shuffle (fourth generation) [2010]

After the odd third-generation Shuffle, which removed the physical buttons from the device entirely to rely on headphone controls, Apple’s current iPod Shuffle is similar to the second-generation design, a small, clip-on device with hardware controls.

iPod Nano (seventh Generation) [2012]

The current Nano resembles an iPod Touch in form factor with a touchscreen and home button, but lacks most of the software functionality of the more powerful iOS devices.

iPod Touch (sixth generation) [2015]

The fifth-generation iPod touch changed out the classic iPod-esque glossy aluminum back for more colorful brushed aluminum. The current sixth-generation model introduced last year uses a similar design but upgraded the processor to the iPhone 6’s A8 chip. (The current iPhone 7 uses an A10 Fusion processor, two generations ahead.)

Sours: https://www.theverge.com/2016/10/23/13359534/ipod-mini-nano-touch-shuffle-15-years-visual-history-apple
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Identify your iPod model

Find out which iPod model you have by its model number and other details.

iPod touch (7th generation)

  • Navigation: Multi-Touch display
  • Capacity: 32, 128, 256 GB
  • Model number and date introduced: A2178: May 2019

iPod touch (7th generation) has an 8MP camera and FaceTime HD camera.

iPod touch (6th generation)

  • Navigation: Multi-Touch display
  • Capacity: 16, 32, 64, 128 GB
  • Model number and date introduced: A1574: July 2015

iPod touch (6th generation) has an iSight camera and FaceTime HD camera.

iPod touch (6th generation) is available in five colors, as well as a (PRODUCT)RED version.

iPod touch (5th generation)

  • Navigation: Multi-Touch display
  • Capacity: 16, 32, and 64 GB
  • Model numbers and dates introduced: 
    • A1509: June 2014
    • A1421: May 2013
    • A1421: October 2012

iPod touch (5th generation) has an iSight camera and FaceTime HD camera. The iPod touch loop is included with the 32 GB and 64 GB models.

iPod touch (5th generation) is available in five colors.

iPod touch (5th generation 16 GB, Mid 2013)

  • Navigation: Multi-Touch display
  • Capacity: 16 GB
  • Model number and date introduced: A1509: May 2013

This model is available in silver and has a FaceTime HD camera.

iPod touch (4th generation)

  • Navigation: Multi-Touch display
  • Capacity: 8, 16, 32, and 64 GB
  • Model numbers and dates introduced: 
    • A1367: October 2012
    • A1367: October 2011
    • A1367: September 2010

iPod touch (4th generation) has an iSight camera and FaceTime HD camera.

iPod touch (4th generation) is available in white and black.

iPod touch (3rd generation)

  • Navigation: Multi-Touch display
  • Capacity: 32 and 64 GB
  • Model number and date introduced: A1318: September 2009

iPod touch (3rd generation) features a 3.5-inch (diagonal) widescreen Multi-Touch display and 32 GB or 64 GB flash drive.

You can distinguish the iPod touch (3rd generation) from iPod touch (2nd generation) by looking at the back of the device. In the text below the engraving, look for the model number.

iPod touch (2nd generation)

  • Navigation: Multi-Touch display
  • Capacity: 8, 16, and 32 GB
  • Model numbers and dates introduced: 
    • A1288: September 2008
    • A1319 for China mainland only: September 2008

iPod touch (2nd generation) features a 3.5-inch (diagonal) widescreen Multi-Touch display and 8 GB, 16 GB, or 32 GB flash drive.

You can distinguish the iPod touch (2nd generation) from the previous model by its contoured design and oval shaped antennae cover in the back upper left corner.

iPod touch

  • Navigation: Multi-Touch display
  • Capacity: 8, 16, and 32 GB
  • Model numbers and dates introduced: 
    • A1213: February 2008
    • A1213: September 2007

iPod touch features a 3.5-inch (diagonal) widescreen Multi-Touch display and 8 GB, 16 GB, or 32 GB flash drive. You can browse the web with Safari and watch YouTube videos on the first-ever Wi-Fi iPod. You can also search, preview, and buy songs from the iTunes Wi-Fi Music Store on iPod touch.

iPod nano (7th generation Mid 2015)

  • Navigation: Multi-Touch display
  • Capacity: 16 GB
  • Model number and dates introduced: A1446: July 2015

iPod nano (7th generation Mid 2015) is available in five colors, as well as a (PRODUCT)RED version.

iPod nano (7th generation)

  • Navigation: Multi-Touch display
  • Capacity: 16 GB
  • Model number and date introduced: A1446: October 2012

iPod nano (7th generation) is available in eight colors.

iPod nano (6th generation)

  • Navigation: Multi-Touch display
  • Capacity: 8 and 16 GB
  • Model number and date introduced: A1366: September 2010

iPod nano (6th generation) is available in six colors.

iPod nano (PRODUCT) RED Special Edition is available only from the Apple Store, with a 8 GB or 16 GB capacity. Apple contributes a portion of each iPod nano (PRODUCT) RED Special Edition purchase to the Global Fund to fight HIV/AIDS in Africa.

iPod nano (5th generation)

  • Navigation: Click Wheel
  • Capacity: 8 and 16 GB
  • Model number and date introduced: A1320: September 2009

You can distinguish the iPod nano (5th generation) from previous iPod nano models by:

  • Its taller screen when compared to iPod nano (4th generation)
  • Its polished anodized aluminum finish
  • The inclusion of a camera and microphone on the back of the device

The iPod nano (5th generation) comes in nine colors.

iPod nano (4th generation)

  • Navigation: Click Wheel
  • Capacity: 8 and 16 GB
  • Model number and date introduced: A1285: September 2008

You can distinguish the iPod nano (4th generation) from previous iPod nano models by:

  • Its taller screen
  • Its curved surface
  • Its oval shape when seen from the top or bottom
  • The inclusion of an accelerometer that is used by the Shake feature.

The iPod nano (4th generation) comes in nine colors.

iPod nano (3rd generation)

  • Navigation: Click Wheel
  • Capacity: 4 and 8 GB
  • Model number and date introduced: A1236: September 2007

You can distinguish the iPod nano (3rd generation) from previous iPod nano models by:

  • Its wider screen
  • Hold switch is on the bottom
  • Its ability to play video

The last three characters of the serial number will be one of these: YOP, YOR, YXR, YXT, YXV, or YXX.

The iPod nano (3rd generation) comes in five colors.

iPod nano (2nd generation)

  • Navigation: Click Wheel
  • Capacity: 2, 4, and 8 GB
  • Model number and date introduced: A1199: September 2006

You can distinguish the iPod nano (2nd generation) from other models by:

  • Its smaller size
  • Its colors
  • The dock connector and headphone port are both located on the bottom of the device

The iPod nano (PRODUCT) RED Special Edition is an iPod nano (2nd generation) available in red and with a 4 GB or 8 GB drive capacity. With each iPod nano (PRODUCT) RED purchased, $10 from the sale goes directly to the Global Fund to fight AIDS in Africa.

iPod nano

  • Navigation: Click Wheel
  • Capacity: 1, 2, and 4 GB
  • Model numbers and dates introduced: 
    • A1137: February 2006
    • A1137: September 2005

iPod nano is smaller than iPod mini and has a color screen and a Click Wheel but has flash memory instead of a hard drive. You sync music and photos with a USB 2 cable—not FireWire. The capacity of the iPod nano is engraved on the back of the case.

iPod nano comes in white and black.

iPod shuffle (4th generation Mid 2015)

  • Navigation: Control Pad
  • Capacity: 2 GB
  • Model number and dates introduced: A1373: July 2015

iPod shuffle (4th generation Mid 2015) is available in five colors, as well as a (PRODUCT)RED version.

iPod shuffle (4th generation Late 2012)

  • Navigation: Control Pad
  • Capacity: 2 GB
  • Model number and date introduced: A1373: September 2012

iPod shuffle (4th generation Late 2012) is available in seven colors.

iPod shuffle (4th generation)

  • Navigation: Control Pad
  • Capacity: 2 GB
  • Model number and date introduced: A1373: September 2010

iPod shuffle (4th generation) is available in five colors.

iPod shuffle (3rd generation Late 2009)

  • Navigation: Apple Earphones with Remote
  • Capacity: 2 and 4 GB
  • Model number and dates introduced: A1271: September 2009

iPod shuffle (3rd generation Late 2009) includes a three-position switch that toggles between off, play in order, and shuffle, similar to the original iPod shuffle. This model has a headphone port that also connects to a computer's USB port. It has a clip similar to the iPod shuffle (2nd generation). iPod shuffle (3rd generation Late 2009) is smaller than the previous generations and has one status light. Previous iPod shuffle generations had two.

iPod shuffle (3rd generation Late 2009) is available in five colors.

The iPod shuffle (3rd generation Late 2009) also comes in a Special Limited Edition 4 GB model only available from the Apple Store. It comes in polished stainless steel.

iPod shuffle (3rd generation)

  • Navigation: Apple Earphones with Remote
  • Capacity: 4 GB
  • Model number and date introduced: A1271: March 2009

iPod shuffle (3rd generation) includes a single 3-position switch that toggles between off, play in order, and shuffle similar to the original iPod shuffle. This model has a headphone port that also connects to a computer's USB port. It has a clip similar to the iPod shuffle (2nd generation). iPod shuffle (3rd generation) is smaller than the previous generations and has one status light. Previous iPod shuffle generations had two.

iPod shuffle (2nd generation)

  • Navigation: Control Pad
  • Capacity: 1 and 2 GB
  • Model numbers and dates introduced: 
    • A1204: February 2008
    • A1204: September 2006

iPod shuffle (2nd generation) is smaller than the original iPod shuffle and has no USB connector.

The last three characters of the serial number will be one of these: 1ZH, 1ZK, 1ZM, 1ZP, or 1ZR.

iPod shuffle

  • Navigation: Control Pad
  • Capacity: 512 MB and 1 GB
  • Model number and date introduced: A1112: January 2005

iPod shuffle is smaller than iPod mini and has no display. There are LED lights on the front and back. The capacity of the drive is engraved on the front USB connector.

iPod mini (2nd generation)

  • Navigation: Click Wheel
  • Capacity: 4 and 6 GB
  • Model number and date introduced: A1051: February 2005

You can distinguish the iPod mini (2nd generation) models from the original iPod mini models by:

  • The hard-drive size is engraved on back of the device
  • The Click Wheel text color matches the color of the device

iPod mini

  • Navigation: Click Wheel
  • Capacity: 4 GB
  • Model number and date introduced: A1051: January 2004

iPod mini is distinguished from other models by:

  • Its smaller size
  • Its colors
  • The Hold switch, which is on the top-left side
  • The Click Wheel's button labels, which are on the wheel itself

iPod classic 160 GB (Late 2009)

  • Navigation: Click Wheel
  • Capacity: 160 GB
  • Model number and date introduced: A1238: September 2009

The iPod classic 160 GB (Late 2009) is a hard drive-based iPod featuring a large, widescreen color display, a Click Wheel, and the capability of displaying photos and videos. It uses USB for syncing.

The iPod classic is available in silver and black, and has an anodized aluminum and polished stainless steel enclosure.

 

iPod classic (120 GB)

  • Navigation: Click Wheel
  • Capacity: 120 GB
  • Model number and date introduced: A1238: September 2008

The iPod classic (120 GB) is a hard drive-based iPod featuring a large, widescreen color display, a Click Wheel, and the capability of displaying photos and videos. It uses USB for syncing.

The iPod classic is available in silver and black, and has an anodized aluminum and polished stainless steel enclosure.

 

iPod classic

  • Navigation: Click Wheel
  • Capacity: 80 and 160 GB
  • Model number and date introduced: A1238: September 2007

The iPod classic is a hard drive-based iPod featuring a large, widescreen color display, a Click Wheel, and the capability of displaying photos and videos. It uses USB for syncing.

The last three characters of the serial number will be one of these: Y5N, YMU, YMV, or YMX.

The iPod classic is available in silver and black, and has an anodized aluminum and polished stainless steel enclosure.

iPod (5th generation Late 2006)—also known as iPod with video or Fifth Generation iPod

  • Navigation: Click Wheel
  • Capacity: 30 and 80 GB
  • Model number and date introduced: A1238: September 2006

The last three characters of the serial number will be one of these: V9K, V9P, V9M, V9R, V9L, V9N, V9Q, V9S, WU9, WUA, WUB, WUC, or X3N. The Fifth Generation U2 Special Edition iPod (30 GB Late 2006) serial number's last three characters are W9G.

iPod (5th generation)—also known as iPod with video or Fifth Generation iPod

  • Navigation: Click Wheel
  • Capacity: 30 and 60 GB
  • Model number and date introduced: A1238: October 2005

The iPod (5th generation) is a hard drive-based iPod featuring a large, widescreen color display, a Click Wheel, and the capability of displaying photos and videos. It uses USB for syncing.

The iPod (5th generation) comes in white and black.

iPod Special Edition U2

  • Navigation: Click Wheel
  • Capacity: 20 and 30 GB
  • Model numbers and dates introduced: 
    • A1136: September 2006
    • A1136: June 2006
    • A1099: June 2005
    • A1059: October 2004

The iPod Special Edition U2 is a standard iPod model with some differences, including: Black plastic exterior, red Click Wheel, signatures of the U2 band members engraved on the back, and "iPod Special Edition U2" engraved on the back.

The first model was based on an iPod (Click Wheel) with a 20 GB hard drive. In June 2005, a new version of the iPod Special Edition U2 was introduced that was based on an iPod with color display. These are both also considered fourth-generation iPod models. In June 2006, a new version of the iPod Special Edition U2 was introduced that is based on a 5th-generation iPod (also known as iPod with video) with a 30 GB hard drive. In September 2006, a model based on the iPod (5th generation Late 2006) was introduced.

The last three characters of the serial number are W9G.

iPod with color display

  • Navigation: Click Wheel
  • Capacity: 20 and 60 GB
  • Model number and date introduced: A1099: June 2005

iPod and iPod photo are now one and the same, with every white iPod boasting a full-color display. They continue to have the same controls as iPod (Click Wheel) but now all models have a color display like iPod photo—ideal for viewing album artwork and playing slideshows. These are considered fourth-generation models along with iPod (Click Wheel).

iPod photo (also known as iPod with color display)

  • Navigation: Click Wheel
  • Capacity: 30, 40, and 60 GB
  • Model numbers and dates introduced: 
    • A1099: February 2005
    • A1099: October 2004

iPod photo models are functionally and visually identical to the iPod with color display (see above photo).

iPod (Click Wheel)

  • Navigation: Click Wheel
  • Capacity: 20 and 40 GB
  • Model number and date introduced: A1059: July 2004

iPod (Click Wheel) models have a Click Wheel like the iPod mini, but are larger and the hold switch is on the top-right side. iPod (Click Wheel) models have a monochrome display. iPod (Click Wheel) is referred to as the fourth-generation iPod.

iPod (Dock Connector)

  • Navigation: Touch Wheel
  • Capacity: 10, 15, 20, 30, and 40 GB
  • Model numbers and dates introduced: 
    • A1040: September 2003
    • A1040: April 2003

iPod (dock connector) models have a dock connector on the bottom.

Newer iPod models like iPod (Click Wheel) and iPod mini also have a dock connector, but the iPod (Dock Connector) has a touch wheel instead of a Click Wheel and the four control buttons are above the touch wheel. iPod (Dock Connector) models are referred to as third-generation iPod models.

iPod (Touch Wheel)

  • Navigation: Touch Wheel
  • Capacity: 10 and 20 GB
  • Model number and date introduced: A1019: July 2002

All iPod (Touch Wheel) models have a FireWire port cover. Scroll wheel models don't, and dock connector models don't have a FireWire port. The iPod (Touch Wheel) model controls look similar to the iPod (Scroll Wheel) but the touch wheel itself doesn't turn. iPod (Touch Wheel) models are considered second-generation iPod models.

iPod (Scroll Wheel)

  • Navigation: Scroll Wheel
  • Capacity: 5 and 10 GB
  • Model numbers and dates introduced: 
    • M8541: March 2002
    • M8541: October 2001

iPod (Scroll Wheel) models have a scroll wheel that physically turns. The controls (Play, Menu, Next, Previous) are in a circle around the wheel. iPod (Scroll Wheel) models are referred to as first-generation iPod models.

Published Date: 

Sours: https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT204217
Using An iPod Nano 3rd Gen (2007) In 2021 - Classic Tech

iPod nano: Everything You Need to Know

Apple's iPod nano​ was the perfect intermediate MP3 player, sitting right in the​ middle of the iPod line and offering a combination of great performance and features with a low price.

The iPod nano doesn't offer a big screen or big storage capacity like the iPod touch, but it's got more features than the Shuffle (and, unlike the Shuffle, it's got a screen!). The nano started out as a lightweight, portable MP3 player, and over the years added features include video playback, video recording, and an FM radio. This has made the iPod nano much more like its competitors, but it's still one of the best portable music devices of its kind.

Read on to learn all about the iPod nano, its history, features, and how to buy and use it.

Apple discontinued the entire iPod nano line on July 27, 2017. While there are no new iPod nanos coming, there are lots still in use. This article can help iPod nano owners continue to enjoy the devices.

Information About Every iPod nano Model

The original iPod nano debuted in Fall 2005 and was updated roughly every year (But not anymore. Check out the end of the article for information on the end of the nano). The models are:

  • 1st Generation iPod nano: The original model offered a small color screen and 1 GB, 2 GB, and 4 GB storage capacity for audio. Also known as Apple model number A1137. 
  • 2nd Generation iPod nano: This model doubled storage capacity — 2 GB, 4 GB, and 8 GB — and brought bright case colors to the nano line. ​Also known as Apple model number A1199.
  • 3rd Generation iPod nano: ​A big change to the nano thanks to its squat form factor and video playback. Models offered 4 GB and 8 GB capacity. Also known as Apple model number A1236.
  • 4th Generation iPod nano: A return to the vertical form factor, with capacity raised to 16 GB at the high-end, and nine brightly colored models. Also known as Apple model number A1285.
  • 5th Generation iPod nano: The same form factor as the 4th generation model, but it added a video camera and FM radio tuner to create a versatile, capable iPod. ​Also known as Apple model number A1320.
  • 6th Generation iPod nano: A major redesign in shape and functionality. This model added a multitouch screen, removed video playback and the video camera, and changed how you use the nano in ways some users didn't like. Also known as Apple model number A1366.
  • 7th Generation iPod nano: Another major redesign, also the last iPod nano model. The 7th generation model added a big touchscreen and a home button, making it look like a shrunken iPod touch. It also restored video playback and added support for Bluetooth headphones and bluetooth speakers. Also known as Apple model number A1446.

iPod Nano Hardware Features

Over the years, iPod nano models have offered many different kinds of hardware. The latest, 7th generation model sports the following hardware features:

  • Screen: A 2.5-inch, rectangular multitouch screen.
  • Touchscreen: The 7th gen. nano has a touchscreen (no more Click wheel on any nano models). Like the iPhone and iPad, it's a multitouch screen.
  • Memory: The iPod nano uses solid-state Flash memory to store music, video, and other data.
  • Accelerometer: The 4th, 5th, and 7th generation nanos include an accelerometer like in the iPhone and iPod touch that allows the display to automatically re-orient itself based on how the nano is held (you can also manually rotate the screen). 
  • FM Tuner: The 5th, 6th, and 7th generation models sport an FM radio tuner ​that allows users to listen to and record radio, as well as tag favorite songs to buy later.
  • Bluetooth: Connecting to wireless headphones and speakers is supported on the 7th generation model, using this close-range wireless technology.
  • Lightning Dock Connector: The 7th generation nano uses Apple's Lightning dock connector for syncing with computers, the same small port used on the iPhone 5 and up. All previous nano models used Apple's Dock Connector port.

How to Buy an iPod nano

Thanks to its many useful features, the iPod nano is a compelling package. If you're considering buying an iPod nano, read these articles:

How to Set up and Use an iPod nano

Once you've bought an iPod nano, you need to set it up and start using it! The set-up process is pretty easy and quick. Once you've completed it, you can move on to the good stuff, like:

If you're upgrading from another iPod or MP3 player, there may be music on your old device that you want to transfer to your computer before setting up your nano. There are a few ways to do this, but the easiest is probably by using third-party software.

iPod nano Help and Support

The iPod nano is a pretty simple device to use. Still, you may run into a few instances in which you need troubleshooting help, such as:

You’ll also want to take precautions with your nano and yourself, such as avoiding hearing loss or theft, and learning how to save your iPod nano if it gets very wet.

After a year or two, you may start to notice some degradation of the nano's battery life. When that time comes, you’ll need to decide whether to buy a new MP3 player or look into battery replacement services.

How Does the iPod Click Wheel Work?

Early versions of the iPod nano used the famous iPod click wheel for scrolling and selecting on the screen. Learning how the Click wheel works will help you appreciate what a great bit of engineering it is.

Clicking the click wheel simply involves buttons. The wheel has icons at its four sides, one each for menu, play/pause, and back and forward. It also has a center button. Beneath each of these icons is a sensor that, when pressed, sends the appropriate signal to the iPod. Pretty simple, right?

Scrolling's a bit more complicated. The click wheel uses a technology similar to that used in touchpads on laptops (while Apple eventually developed its own Click wheel, the original iPod click wheels were made by Synaptics, a company that makes touchpads). This is called capacitive sensing.

The iPod click wheel is made up of a couple of layers. On top is the plastic cover used for scrolling and clicking. Beneath that is a membrane that conducts electrical charges. The membrane is attached to a cable that sends signals to the iPod. The membrane has conductors built into it called channels. At each place where channels cross each other, an address point is created.

The iPod is always sending electricity through this membrane. When a conductor — in this case, your finger; remember, the human body conducts electricity — touches the click wheel, the membrane tries to complete the circuit by sending electricity to your finger. But, since people probably wouldn't like getting shocks from their iPods, the plastic cover of the touch wheel blocks the current from going to your finger. Instead, the channels in the membrane detect the address point of the charge, which tells the iPod what kind of command you're sending to it via the click wheel.

The End of the iPod nano​

While the iPod nano was a great device for many years and sold millions of units, Apple discontinued it in 2017. With the rise of the iPhone, iPad, and similar devices, the market for dedicated music players like the nano had shrunk to a point where it didn't make sense to continue the device. The iPod nano is still a great device and easy to find. So, if you want to get one, you should be able to get a good deal and use it for years to come. 

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Sours: https://www.lifewire.com/apple-ipod-nano-everything-to-know-1999771

Nano types ipod

List of iPod models

Model Generation Image Capacity Connection Original release date Minimum OS to sync Rated battery life (hours)Classic1st 1st generation iPod5, 10 GB FireWireOctober 23, 2001 Mac: 9, 10.1audio: 10 First model, with mechanical scroll wheel. 10 GB model released later. 2nd 2nd generation iPod (2002).10, 20 GB FireWire July 17, 2002 Mac: 10.1
Win: 2000
audio: 10 Touch-sensitive wheel. FireWire port had a cover. Hold switch revised. Windows compatibility through Musicmatch. 3rd 3rd generation iPod10, 15, 20, 30, 40 GB FireWire (USB for syncing only)April 28, 2003 Mac: 10.1
Win: 2000
audio: 8 First complete redesign with all-touch interface, dock connector, 4-pin remote connector and slimmer case. Musicmatch support dropped with later release of iTunes 4.1 for Windows. 4th
(Photo)
(with color display) 4th generation iPod.20, 40 GB FireWire or USBJuly 19, 2004 Mac: 10.2
Win: 2000
audio: 12 Adopted Click Wheel from iPod Mini, added charging through USB in addition to FireWire. 4th generation iPod With Color Display.photo:
30, 40, 60 GB FireWire or USB October 26, 2004 Mac: 10.2
Win: 2000
audio: 15
slideshow: 5 color:
20, 60 GB June 28, 2005 Premium spin-off of 4th generation iPod with color screen, plus picture viewing. Later reintegrated into main iPod line.5th 5th generation iPod.30, 60, 80 GB USB (FireWire for charging only)October 12, 2005 Mac: 10.3
Win: 2000
30 GB
audio: 14
video: 2
(later 3.5)60/80 GB
audio: 20
video: 3/6.5 Second full redesign with a slimmer case, and larger screen with video playback. Remote connector near the headphone jack was omitted as was syncing through FireWire. Offered in black or white. Hardware and firmware updated with 60 GB model replaced with 80 GB model on September 12, 2006. 6th 6th generation iPod.80, 120, 160 GB USB (FireWire for charging only)September 5, 2007 Mac: 10.4
Win: XP
80 GB
audio: 30
video: 5 120 GB
audio: 36
video: 6 160 GB
2007 model
audio: 40
video: 7
2009 model
audio: 36
video: 6 Introduced the "Classic" suffix. New interface and anodized aluminum front plate. Silver replaces white. In September 2008 the hardware and firmware was updated with a 120 GB model replacing the 80 GB model and the 160 GB model was discontinued. In September 2009, the 120 GB model was replaced with a 160 GB model. Discontinued on September 9, 2014. Mini1st 1st generation iPod Mini.4 GB USB or FireWire January 6, 2004 Mac: 10.1
Win: 2000
audio: 8 New smaller model, available in 5 colors. Introduced the "Click Wheel". 2nd 2nd generation iPod Mini.4, 6 GB USB or FireWire February 22, 2005 Mac: 10.2
Win: 2000
audio: 18 Brighter color variants with longer battery life. Click Wheel lettering matched body color. Gold color discontinued. Later replaced by iPod Nano.Nano1st 1st generation iPod Nano.1, 2, 4 GB USB (FireWire for charging only)September 7, 2005 Mac: 10.3
Win: 2000
audio: 14
slideshow: 4 Replaced Mini. Available in black or white and used flash memory. Color screen for picture viewing. 1 GB version released later. 2nd 4 GB silver iPod Nano2, 4, 8 GB USB (FireWire for charging only)September 12, 2006 Mac: 10.3
Win: 2000
audio: 24
slideshow: 5 Anodized aluminum casing and 6 colors available. 3rd 4 GB 3rd generation iPod Nano.4, 8 GB USB (FireWire for charging only)September 5, 2007 Mac: 10.4
Win: XP
audio: 24
video: 5 2" QVGA screen, colors refreshed with chrome back, new interface, video capability, smaller Click Wheel. 4th 16 GB Flash Drive 4th generation iPod Nano.4, 8, 16 GB USB September 9, 2008 Mac: 10.4
Win: XP
audio: 24
video: 4 Reverted to tall form factor and all-aluminum enclosure with nine color choices, added accelerometer for "shake to shuffle" functionality and horizontal viewing. 4 GB model limited release in selected markets. 5th 16 GB Flash Drive 5th generation iPod Nano with camera.8, 16 GB USB September 9, 2009 Mac: 10.4
Win: XP
audio: 24
video: 5 First iPod to include a video camera; also included a larger screen, FM radio, speaker, pedometer, and a polished exterior case while retaining similar colors to the 4th generation model. 6th Silver 6th generation iPod Nano8, 16 GB USB September 1, 2010 Mac: 10.5
Win: XP
audio: 24 First iPod Nano to include multi-touch screen; clip from iPod Shuffle added. Video playback, speakers and camera removed. 7th Black 7th generation iPod Nano.16 GB USB September 12, 2012 Mac: 10.6
Win: XP
audio: 30
video: 3.5 Reverted to tall form factor with larger 2.5" multi-touch screen. Clip removed. Video playback restored and Bluetooth added. Replaced 30-pin dock connector with new Lightning connector. Discontinued July 27, 2017.[1]Shuffle1st 1st generation iPod Shuffle.512 MB, 1 GB USB
(no adaptor required)
January 11, 2005 Mac: 10.2
Win: 2000
audio: 12 New entry-level model. Uses flash memory and has no screen. 2nd 2nd generation iPod Shuffle1, 2 GB USB September 12, 2006 Mac: 10.3
Win: 2000
audio: 12 Smaller clip design with anodized aluminum casing. 4 color options added later. Colors were changed in 2007 and 2008. 3rd 3rd generation iPod Shuffle2, 4 GB USB March 11, 2009 Mac: 10.4
Win: XP
audio: 10 Smaller design with controls relocated to right earbud cable. Introduced with two colors, and featured VoiceOver. More colors and 2 GB model added in September 2009. 4th 4th generation iPod Shuffle.2 GB USB September 1, 2010 Mac: 10.5
Win: XP
audio: 15 Controls returned to the body of the iPod. Introduced with five colors, and featured VoiceOver. Discontinued July 27, 2017.[1]Touch1st 1st generation iPod Touch.8, 16, 32 GB USB (FireWire for charging only)[2]September 5, 2007 Mac: 10.4
Win: XP
audio: 22
video: 5 First iPod with Wi-Fi and a Multi-touch interface. Features Safari browser and wireless access to the iTunes Store and YouTube. 32 GB model later added. iOS 2.0 and App Store access required an upgrade fee. 2nd 2nd generation iPod Touch.8, 16, 32 GB USB September 9, 2008 Mac: 10.4
Win: XP
audio: 36
video: 6 New tapered chrome back with Nike+ functionality, volume buttons, and built-in speaker added. iOS 2.0 and App Store access standard. Bluetooth support added but not made active until iOS 3.0, which required an upgrade fee. 3rd 32, 64 GB USB September 9, 2009 Mac: 10.4
Win: XP
audio: 30
video: 6 Updated to include the upgraded internals from the iPhone 3GS; included Voice Control support and bundled remote earphones. 4th4th generation iPod Touch.8, 16, 32, 64 GB USB September 1, 2010 Mac: 10.5
Win: XP
audio: 40
video: 7 New thinner design including two cameras for FaceTime and HD video recording, hold button moved to top right corner, Retina Display similar to iPhone 4, Apple A4 chip. White-colored version added on October 4, 2011. 5th5th generation iPod Touch.16, 32, 64 GB USB (over Lightning) September 12, 2012 Mac: 10.6
Win: XP
audio: 40
video: 8 New aluminum design with colored case options. Featured improved cameras along with A5 processor, Siri, and taller 4" Retina Display. First 16 GB models released have no color choices and no iSight camera, In early 2014 16 GB models were released that featured iSight cameras and color choices. 6th6th generation iPod Touch.16, 32, 64, 128 GB USB (over Lightning) July 15, 2015 Mac: 10.7
Win: 7
audio: 40
video: 8 Updated with a new lineup of six colors, a new 128 GB model, and improved internals. The improved internals feature new cameras and the A8 processor with M8 motion coprocessor, 1 GB of RAM (twice the amount of the previous generation), and 802.11ac Wi-Fi.[3]7th7th generation iPod Touch.32, 128, 256 GB USB (over Lightning) May 28, 2019 Mac: 10.11.4
Win: 7
audio: 40
video: 8 Updated with a new 256 GB model, and an upgraded SoC from the A8 to the A10 Fusion. Also added support for features not previously supported on the 6th generation iPod touch, like AR and Group FaceTime.[4]

Sources: Apple Inc.,[5]Mactracker[6]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_iPod_models
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